A Global View: Recent Acquisitions of Textiles, 2012–2016

Exhibition

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A work made of wool; pressed and needle punched felt, laser cut; appliquéd with cotton and nylon mono-filament.
Gusanos (Worms), 2013
Francisco Toledo

The Department of Textiles periodically celebrates its good fortune by presenting installations of works the department has acquired in the preceding few years. Since the last such presentation in 2012, the department has acquired 105 objects, some by purchase, others by gift.

This display features 39 of those works—showcasing a remarkable variety of cultures, periods, and textile types that mirror the encyclopedic scope of the museum as a whole. The objects are divided into three sections: contemporary weavings, American and European textiles, and Middle Eastern and Asian works. There are masterpieces in each section.

The installation also continues the celebration of the museum’s long and symbiotic relationship with the School of the Art Institute, as several of the contemporary works are by three artists with connections to the school.

As this presentation attests—in its breadth and its quality—the last few years have indeed been fortuitous for the Department of Textiles, and our gratitude is extended to all whose generosity helped strengthen this collection, either through the direct gift of objects or through the contribution of funds that made acquisitions possible

A work made of wool, plain weave; fulled (gorofukuren); appliqué; edged with fur and silk, plain weave with secondary plain interlacings; lined with silk and gilt-paper strips, satin weave with plain interlacings of secondary binding warps and supplementary patterning wefts; closure: wool plain weave, fulled; embroidered with silk cord; edged with silk and gilt-paper strips, plain weave; band of silk, plain oblique interlacing with attached wooden bead.
Jinbaori, 1701–1725
Japan
A work made of linen, plain weave; embroidered with silk and wool in tent and cross stitch.
Hanging (Depicting the Story of Esther and King Ahasuerus) (Needlework), 1575–1600
France

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