Improvisation No. 30 (Cannons)

Abstract painting of cannons and buildings in an array of bright colors.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • Abstract painting of cannons and buildings in an array of bright colors.

Date:

1913

Artist:

Vasily Kandinsky
French, born Russia, 1866–1944

About this artwork

In his seminal 1912 text Concerning the Spiritual in Art, Vasily Kandinsky advocated an art that could move beyond imitation of the physical world, inspiring, as he put it, “vibrations in the soul.” Pioneering abstraction as the richest, most musical form of artistic expression, Kandinsky believed that the physical properties of artworks could stir emotions, and he produced a revolutionary group of increasingly abstract canvases—with titles such as Fugue, Impression, and Improvisation—hoping to bring painting closer to music making.

Kandinsky’s paintings are, in his words, “largely unconscious, spontaneous expressions of inner character, nonmaterial in nature.” Although Improvisation No. 30 (Cannons) at first appears to be an almost random assortment of brilliant colors, shapes, and lines, the artist also included leaning buildings, a crowd of people, and a wheeled, smoking cannon. In a letter to the Chicago lawyer Arthur Jerome Eddy, who purchased the painting in 1913 and later bequeathed it to the Art Institute, Kandinsky explained that “the presence of the cannons in the picture could probably be explained by the constant war talk that has been going on throughout the year.” Eventually, Kandinsky ceased making these references to the material world in his work and wholly devoted himself to pure abstraction.

On View

Modern Art, Gallery 392

Artist

Vasily Kandinsky

Title

Improvisation No. 30 (Cannons)

Origin

Germany

Date

1913

Medium

Oil on canvas

Inscriptions

signed, l.l.: “Kandsky i9i3”

Dimensions

111 × 111.3 cm (43 11/16 × 43 13/16 in.)

Credit Line

Arthur Jerome Eddy Memorial Collection

Reference Number

1931.511

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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