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Cravat End

A rectangular piece of cream-colored lace fabric boasts a complex design that includes flowers, leaves, roosters, trumpeting angels, armed female warriors, and more.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A rectangular piece of cream-colored lace fabric boasts a complex design that includes flowers, leaves, roosters, trumpeting angels, armed female warriors, and more.

Date:

1700-50

Artist:

Flanders, Brussels (present day Belgium)

About this artwork

When the heavily Baroque fashions originating at the court of Louis XIV (r. 1643–1715) were simplified during the late 1660s, accessories underwent similar changes. Once belonging to a set of two, this splendid piece of Brussels lace may have been made for the Sun King himself shortly before his death. This type of bobbin part-lace, initially produced in Brussels during the eighteenth century, consists of individual motifs made separately but joined together so skillfully that the seams are almost imperceptible. Worn with its mate, slightly gathered at the neck, this rectangular piece of fabric is replete with symbols signifying the elevated status of its wearer. At center are a rooster and trophies, beneath which is the king’s monogram of double Ls. Surmounting this image and supported by two trumpeting angels is a baldachin, a canopy carried over important personages during processions. Armed female warriors appear to the right and left, and gracing the upper corners are the Maltese cross and the sun, the latter the emblem of Louis.

Status

Currently Off View

Department

Textiles

Title

Cravat End

Origin

Flanders

Date

Made 1700–1750

Medium

Linen, bobbin part-lace of a type known as "Brussels" with a Droschel mesh ground

Inscriptions

[Lower center]: Monogram LL

Dimensions

32.1 × 41.7 cm (12 5/8 × 16 3/8 in.)

Credit Line

Purchased with funds provided by Mr. and Mrs. John V. Farwell III

Reference Number

1987.334

IIIF Manifest  The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) represents a set of open standards that enables rich access to digital media from libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions around the world.

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https://api.artic.edu/api/v1/artworks/70443/manifest.json

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email . Information about image downloads and licensing is available here.

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