Kente Wrapper

A work made of rayon, weft faced plain weave with supplementary and brocading weft patterning.

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  • A work made of rayon, weft faced plain weave with supplementary and brocading weft patterning.

Date:

1901/50

Artist:

Asante
Ghana

About this artwork

Since the early 18th century, kente cloth has been an important part of Asante royal regalia. Known for its bold, contrasting colors and dense patterns, kente has a striking visual impact when worn. Traditionally, Asante men weave kente. They begin by making a long strip, two- to three-inches wide, on a horizontal loom. When finished, the strip is cut into sections of equal length and sewn together edge to edge to make a complete cloth. The heaviest and most elaborate garments may join as many as 24 strips. Though once restricted to royal use, today kente is more accessible to the public. It is often worn on special religious or social occasions, including weddings, child-naming ceremonies, burials, and funerals.

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Textiles

Artist

Asante

Title

Kente Wrapper

Origin

Ghana

Date

1901–1950

Medium

Rayon, weft faced plain weave with supplementary and brocading weft patterning

Dimensions

323.3 × 212.8 cm (127 1/4 × 83 5/8 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. David C. Ruttenberg

Reference Number

1986.1043

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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