Chasuble

A work made of silk, plain weave with twill interlacings of secondary binding warps and gilt-animal-substrate-wrapped silk supplementary facing wefts; supplementary pile warps forming cut voided velvet; edged with gilt-metal-strip-wrapped silk, bobbin-made tape; lined with silk, plain weave.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of silk, plain weave with twill interlacings of secondary binding warps and gilt-animal-substrate-wrapped silk supplementary facing wefts; supplementary pile warps forming cut voided velvet; edged with gilt-metal-strip-wrapped silk, bobbin-made tape; lined with silk, plain weave.

Date:

Late 13th/14th century

Artist:

Iran (Persia, Tabriz)

About this artwork

This chasuble, a Western church vestment worn by bishops and priests during Mass, is made from red velvet patterned with staggered rows of gold disks and is a prime example of cultural exchange between the Middle East and the West. It is one of about 30 surviving pieces with this pattern, most of which are fragments. Papal and Italian church inventories establish that such fabrics were woven in the late 13th and 14th centuries. Long associated with Spain or Italy, this fabric has more recently been attributed to the eastern Islamic world, specifically Tabriz in northwestern Iran. The attribution is based on technical characteristics, inventory descriptions, and Tabriz's fame as a center for luxury textiles.

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Textiles

Title

Chasuble

Origin

Tabriz

Date

1275–1400

Medium

Silk, plain weave with twill interlacings of secondary binding warps and gilt-animal-substrate-wrapped silk supplementary facing wefts; supplementary pile warps forming cut voided velvet; edged with gilt-metal-strip-wrapped silk, bobbin-made tape; lined with silk, plain weave

Dimensions

107.5 x 70.6 cm (42 1/4 x 27 7/8 in.) Repeat: 3.2 x 3.2 cm (1 1/4 x 1 1/4 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Martin A. Ryerson

Reference Number

1911.202

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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