Statuette of a Lictor

A work made of bronze.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of bronze.

Date:

First half of the 1st century AD

Artist:

Roman

About this artwork

The official attendants and bodyguards of Roman magistrates known as lictors were usually citizens of low birth, such as freedmen (former slaves). Typically, as seen here, a lictor wore a toga and carried in his left hand the bundle of elm or birch rods tied with a red belt that symbolized the magistrates’ executive power. This statuette likely belonged to a larger historical relief depicting a ceremonial scene, perhaps on the breastplate of a bronze statue of a horse, where similar statuettes of lictors are known to have been displayed.

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Ancient and Byzantine Art

Artist

Ancient Roman

Title

Statuette of a Lictor

Origin

Roman Empire

Date

1 AD–50 AD

Medium

Bronze

Dimensions

11.7 × 5 × 3 cm (4 5/8 × 2 × 1 1/8 in.)

Credit Line

James W. and Marilynn Alsdorf Collection

Reference Number

1980.809

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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