The Pheasants from the "Verdures of the Vatican" Series

Large fabric panel, pheasants seated on baskets above elaborate birdcage and floral motif design.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

Image actions

  • Large fabric panel, pheasants seated on baskets above elaborate birdcage and floral motif design.

Date:

c. 1799

Artist:

Designed by Jean Démosthène Dugourc (French, 1749–1825)
Manufactured by Camille Pernon & Cie
France, Lyon

About this artwork

Perhaps the last great name connected with the French silk industry in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries is that of Jean-Démosthène Dugourc. A designer of costumes and stage decorations for the French opera, he was also the superintendent of buildings and designer of Garde-Meuble for the Duc d’Orléans. Dugourc was the most outstanding interior decorator of his time, and from 1774 to 1790 he produced designs for the silk manufacturer Camille Pernon of Lyon. Educated in Italy for a time, Dugourc was familiar with the classical antique motifs that Raphael had revived in his fresco decorations for the Vatican Loggie, part of the papal palace in Rome. In fact, the French designer titled a group of textile patterns Verdures of the Vatican. The Pheasants, which was designed for the Spanish royal palace in Madrid, is part of this series. The elaborate composition encompasses a lavish, symmetrical interplay of birds, baskets, strings of pearls, garlands, and ribbons—all realized with the excellence of workmanship that made French silks so desirable.

Currently Off View

Textiles

Artist

Jean-Demosthene Dugourc

Title

The Pheasants from the "Verdures of the Vatican" Series

Origin

Lyon

Date

1794–1805

Medium

Silk, satin weave with plain interlacings of secondary binding warps and brocading wefts; embroidered with silk in chain (tambour work) and satin stitches

Dimensions

242.5 × 44.5 cm (95 1/4 × 17 1/2 in.)

Credit Line

Restricted gift of Mrs. Chauncey B. Borland

Reference Number

1945.12

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

Share

Sign up for our enewsletter to receive updates.

Learn more

Image actions

Share