Plaque with a Bishop

A work made of gilt copper, champlevé enamel.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of gilt copper, champlevé enamel.

Date:

1180/1200

Artist:

Follower of Nicholas of Verdun
(French [Lorraine] or Mosan, active 1181–1205)

About this artwork

This plaque—the finest example of medieval enameling in the Art Institute’s collection—most likely formed the right half of an arch on a reliquary shrine. The bishop represented here holds a model of a church that he has had constructed in his covered right hand, symbolizing the sacred nature of this gift to God. Due to its refined style, scholars have drawn comparisons between this plaque and those of the famous Klosterneuburg retable, which was produced by the artist Nicholas of Verdun in 1181. It has also been suggested that this plaque depicts Archbishop Bruno of Cologne (921–965) holding a model of the Church of Saint Pantaleon in that city. At the very least, it is a remarkable example of the virtuosity of goldsmiths working for wealthy ecclesiastical foundations in the valleys of the Rhine and Meuse rivers during this era.

On View

European Decorative Art, Gallery 236

Artist

Nicholas of Verdun

Title

Plaque with a Bishop

Origin

Germany

Date

1175–1225

Medium

Gilt copper, champlevé enamel

Dimensions

15.2 × 5.6 cm (6 × 2 3/16 in.)

Credit Line

Kate S. Buckingham Endowment

Reference Number

1943.88

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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