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"Eye-Dazzler" Weaving

A work made of cotton and wool, single interlocking tapestry weave; twined selvages and heading, overcast finish terminating in tassels.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of cotton and wool, single interlocking tapestry weave; twined selvages and heading, overcast finish terminating in tassels.

Date:

1880/1900

Artist:

Navajo (Diné)
Northern New Mexico or Arizona, United States

About this artwork

Navajo weavers, most of whom were women, developed a new, more colorful and complex style of weaving in the late 19th century: they began incorporating wool yarns that had been dyed with vibrant commercial dyes, made available through expanded railroads. They often rendered the junctures between colors as serrated, zigzag lines, creating dynamic patterns that visually vibrate. For this reason, these textiles have come to be called “eye dazzlers.”

On View

Textiles, Gallery 136

Culture

Navajo (Diné)

Title

"Eye-Dazzler" Weaving

Origin

New Mexico

Date

Made 1880–1900

Medium

Cotton and wool, single interlocking tapestry weave; twined selvages and heading, overcast finish terminating in tassels

Dimensions

214.5 × 155.7 cm (84 1/2 × 61 1/4 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Mrs. William Bross Lloyd

Reference Number

1964.1134

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email . Information about image downloads and licensing is available here.

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