Man's Cap

A work made of linen, plain weave; embroidered with silk, gilt-strip-wrapped silk, and metal paillettes in ladder and stem stitches; couching and buttonholed couching; edged with bobbin lace.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of linen, plain weave; embroidered with silk, gilt-strip-wrapped silk, and metal paillettes in ladder and stem stitches; couching and buttonholed couching; edged with bobbin lace.

Date:

1575/1600

Artist:

England

About this artwork

Nightcaps for men and their counterparts, coifs for women, were long-lived fashion, from about 1580 until 1650. With their heavy encrustations of decoration they were obviously not intended to be worn while sleeping. For the night wear a plain, warm, knitted woolen "biggin" was used. Like the woman’s cap, the man’s nightcap was meant for indoor wear during social hours at home. Persons of rank or professional men sat for their portraits in them.

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Textiles

Title

Man's Cap

Origin

England

Date

1575–1600

Medium

Linen, plain weave; embroidered with silk, gilt-strip-wrapped silk, and metal paillettes in ladder and stem stitches; couching and buttonholed couching; edged with bobbin lace

Dimensions

18 × 19 cm (7 × 7 1/2 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Emily Crane Chadbourne

Reference Number

1931.261

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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