Aquamanile in the Form of a Lion

A work made of copper alloy.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

Image actions

  • A work made of copper alloy.

Date:

c. 1350

Artist:

Follower of Johannes Apengeter
(German, active about 1325-50)

About this artwork

As the name suggests, an aquamanile—from the Latin for water (aqua) and hand (manus)—is a ewer intended for hand washing. While such vessels were used in both sacred and secular rituals during the Middle Ages, they were also inventive sculptural objects. They usually featured animal forms that could be either whimsical or imposing. This aquamanile, produced by a northern German artist around 1350, takes the shape of a lion, but incorporates three other creatures: a dog that is locked in the lion’s fierce jaws, a basilisk or winged dragon on the lion’s back forming the pitcher’s handle, and a serpentine creature at the end of the lion’s tail.

On View

European Decorative Art, Gallery 236

Artist

Foundry of Johannes Apengeter

Title

Aquamanile in the Form of a Lion

Origin

Germany

Date

1325–1375

Medium

Copper alloy

Dimensions

25.5 × 28.8 × 11.8 cm (10 1/16 × 11 1/4 × 4 3/4 in.)

Credit Line

Through prior bequest of the George F. Harding Collection; Chester D. Tripp, Jane Gidwitz Memorial; and European Painting and Sculpture Purchase funds

Reference Number

2010.30

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

Share

Sign up for our enewsletter to receive updates.

Learn more

Image actions

Share