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Adinkra Wrapper

A work made of 6 panels joined of factory-produced cotton, plain weave self-patterned by warp and weft floats;
embroidered with silk floss and viscose rayon threads in chain stitches.

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  • A work made of 6 panels joined of factory-produced cotton, plain weave self-patterned by warp and weft floats;
embroidered with silk floss and viscose rayon threads in chain stitches.

Date:

Early 20th century (after 1904)

Artist:

Asante
Ghana
Coastal West Africa

About this artwork

Although printed textiles proliferate in contemporary Ghanaian fashion, adinkra were the first and only preindustrial printed textile made in West Africa. This Adinkra Wrapper features a variety of motifs that highlight the wearer’s power and status, including symbols that represent royal hairstyles and dwellings. The garment’s white ground indicates that it was made to be worn for celebratory occasions.

Examples of the types of stamps used to print adinkra are also in our collection.

Status

Currently Off View

Department

Textiles

Culture

Asante

Title

Adinkra Wrapper

Place

Ghana (Object made in)

Date

1904–1950

Medium

6 panels joined of factory-produced cotton, plain weave self-patterned by warp and weft floats; embroidered with silk floss and viscose rayon threads in chain stitches

Dimensions

335.3 × 289.6 cm (132 × 114 in.)

Credit Line

African and Amerindian Art Purchase Fund; African and Amerindian Curator's Discretionary Fund

Reference Number

2008.24

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email . Information about image downloads and licensing is available here.

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