Shutter, Possibly for a Granary

A work made of wood.

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  • A work made of wood.

Date:

19th/mid–20th century

Artist:

Dogon
Mali
Northern Africa and the Sahel

About this artwork

The main types of architectural sculpture among the Dogon are supporting posts for the togu na (men’s meeting shelters) and shutters and doors for granaries and houses. Granaries are narrow, four-sided, mud-brick structures with thatched roofs; the shuttered windows enable the owner’s access to the goods stored inside. Shutters are secured either with a wooden lock or by sealing the edges with mud, and they would have swung open on pivots set into the sill and lintel of the window. This shutter is highly unusual in that it is carved on both sides. The subject matter of the carving—two rows of seven abstract figures—suggests the function of the architecture as storage for food and goods crucial to the well-being and nurturing of humans and by extension the proliferation of Dogon society.
—Permanent Collection Object Description

Currently Off View

Arts of Africa

Culture

Dogon

Title

Shutter, Possibly for a Granary

Origin

Mali

Date

1800–1950

Medium

Wood

Dimensions

H. 50.8 cm (20 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Muriel Kallis Newman

Reference Number

2007.571

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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