Corallo Chair

Jumble of angular orange wires forming a chair

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  • Jumble of angular orange wires forming a chair

Date:

2006

Artist:

Campana Brothers (Brazilian, founded circa 1983)
Fernando Campana (Brazilian, born 1961) and Humberto Campana (Brazilian, born 1953)

Manufactured by Edra
Italian, founded 1987

About this artwork

Fernando and Humberto Campana, designers based in São Paulo, Brazil, are recognized for work that draws inspiration from the culture of their city and the rich tradition of handicrafts made there. Known for transforming freely available waste materials such as bubble wrap, off-cuts of wood, plastic piping, and rope into furniture and other products, the brothers are keen to situate the craftsman’s skills at the center of their projects. In some of their designs, the Campanas use cast-off materials in a way that invites social commentary; in others, they combine rigid steel and informally layered everyday elements, suggesting the confluence of Modernist aesthetics and popular culture that is constantly at play in their work. Corallo Chair, their most ambitious piece to date, illustrates their interest in operating at the frontier of art and design. Made of bent steel wire and painted bright coral, each chair is handcrafted, ensuring that no two are the same. The branchlike form, taken from shapes found in nature, is a response to the chair’s function as an outdoor seating element. Ultimately, however, what anchors the Campanas’ efforts is a divine optimism that something beautiful can result from limited means.

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Architecture and Design

Artist

Campana Brothers

Title

Corallo Chair

Origin

United States

Date

2006

Medium

Bent steel wire and epoxy paint

Dimensions

90.2 × 139.7 × 99.9 cm (35 1/2 × 55 1/8 × 39 1/3 in.)

Credit Line

Restricted gift of the Architecture & Design Society in honor of "The Friends of the Society"

Reference Number

2006.277

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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