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Burning the Rumps at Temple Bar, plate eleven from Hudibras

A work made of engraving in black on cream laid paper edge mounted on cream wove paper.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of engraving in black on cream laid paper edge mounted on cream wove paper.

Date:

February 1725/26

Artist:

William Hogarth
English, 1697-1764

About this artwork

William Hogarth illustrated the story of a sad-sack adventurer named Hudibras in twelve engravings. His source was Samuel Butler’s satirical, mock-heroic poem written in the vein of Cervantes and Rabelais. Ridiculing the puritan party’s attempts to overthrow the British monarchy during the Great Civil War of 1640, Butler’s poem exposes the hypocrisy and pretensions of the Presbyterians, Independents, and Zealots who hoped to establish themselves as leaders.
Here, Hudibras appears in this large crowd scene as a masked dummy about to burnt. A row of London butcher shops is the setting for a protest against the “Rump Parliament,” a political body that had replaced much of the previous government during the English Civil War. Protester at this historical event in 1659 did in fact burn beef rumps in the streets as well as political effigies.

Status

Currently Off View

Department

Prints and Drawings

Artist

William Hogarth

Title

Burning the Rumps at Temple Bar, plate eleven from Hudibras

Origin

England

Date

1725–1726

Medium

Engraving in black on cream laid paper edge mounted on cream wove paper

Dimensions

245 × 495 mm (image); 272 × 505 mm (plate); 274 × 509 mm (primary support); 360 × 568 mm (secondary support)

Credit Line

Sara R. Shorey Endowment; purchased with funds provided by Phyllis Neiman and the Woman's Board in honor of Phyllis Neiman

Reference Number

2005.136.11

IIIF Manifest  The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) represents a set of open standards that enables rich access to digital media from libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions around the world.

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https://api.artic.edu/api/v1/artworks/184616/manifest.json

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email . Information about image downloads and licensing is available here.

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