Kesa

A work made of silk and gilt-paper strip; twill and satin weaves with secondary binding warps and supplementary patterning wefts.
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  • A work made of silk and gilt-paper strip; twill and satin weaves with secondary binding warps and supplementary patterning wefts.

Date:

17th century, Edo period (1615–1868)

Artist:

Japan

About this artwork

The Chinese method for making gold "thread" out of paper coated with lacquer, finished with a layer of gold leaf, and cut into very fine strips was admired greatly by the Japanese but wasn’t adopted in Japan until the late 16th century. Until then, and even after, Chinese textiles utilizing this kinran thread were imported into Japan. The term kinran is also applied to a specific type of textile made in Japan, usually at Nishijin, in Kyoto, that typically displays floral patterns in gold against silk in a dark color. This example features peony blossoms with a lotus pod in the center.

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Textiles

Title

Kesa

Origin

Japan

Date

1615–1699

Medium

Silk and gilt-paper strip; twill and satin weaves with secondary binding warps and supplementary patterning wefts

Dimensions

99.2 x 165.1 cm (39 x 65 in.) Warp repeat: 44.2 cm (17 3/8 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Ralph E. Hays in memory of Mary Van Artsdalen Hays

Reference Number

2004.1008

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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