Kesa

A work made of silk; plain weave, embroidered with silk and gilt-paper-strip-wrapped silk; silk cords.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

Image actions

  • A work made of silk; plain weave, embroidered with silk and gilt-paper-strip-wrapped silk; silk cords.

Date:

1750/1800, Edo period (1615–1868)

Artist:

Japan

About this artwork

This large kesa was made for use by either the Jodo or the Rinzai sect from an elaborately embroidered kosode, or kimono with small sleeves, that was worn off the shoulders and held at the waist by a belt or sash. Together with a sheer white kimono, it was part of the formal summer dress favored by women of the samurai class. The pattern of the kesa fabric consists of the symbols of riches and good fortune, the so-called treasures (takarazukushi). The gold thread was made of gilt-paper strips, but in this work, unlike kinran, the strips were cut extremely fine and wrapped around a silk core.

Currently Off View

Textiles

Title

Kesa

Origin

Japan

Date

1750–1800

Medium

Silk; plain weave, embroidered with silk and gilt-paper-strip-wrapped silk; silk cords

Dimensions

127.8 x 228.8 cm (50 1/4 x 90 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Ralph E. Hays in memory of Mary Van Artsdalen Hays

Reference Number

2004.984

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

Share

Sign up for our enewsletter to receive updates.

Learn more

Image actions

Share