National Academy of Design Competition, New York, New York, South Elevation

A work made of ink, watercolor, and gouache on paper.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of ink, watercolor, and gouache on paper.

Date:

1861

Artist:

Peter Bonnett Wight
American, 1838–1925

About this artwork

Trained in New York, Peter Bonnett Wight was one of the pioneers of the American architectural profession. Wight was inspired by theories of ornament, color, and historicism found in the writings of English architect and theorist John Ruskin. These concerns led to his very early adoption of the High Victorian Gothic for such important commissions as the 1861 National Academy of Design in New York, which did much to popularize this eclectic style in the United States. The National Academy’s polychromatic herringbone brick and Gothic tracery were drawn from the Doge’s Palace in Venice—a building Ruskin believed was the most important Gothic structure in the world. Wight moved to Chicago after the Great Fire of 1871, and became an early promoter of progressive architecture as well as an accomplished critic. His 1919 donation of his library, drawings, and personal papers provides an invaluable look at the ideas and trends guiding architects in the early years of the profession.

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Architecture and Design

Artist

Peter Bonnett Wight (Architect)

Title

National Academy of Design Competition, New York, New York, South Elevation

Origin

New York City

Date

1861

Medium

Ink, watercolor, and gouache on paper

Dimensions

53 x 68.6 cm (20 7/8 x 27 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Peter Bonnett Wight

Reference Number

1992.81.4

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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