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This, My Brother

An oil painting of a large, male African American figure who looks left into the distance. He holds his hand out towards the dark blue sky, and he appears to break free from a pile of rubble in the background.
© The Charles White Archives

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  • An oil painting of a large, male African American figure who looks left into the distance. He holds his hand out towards the dark blue sky, and he appears to break free from a pile of rubble in the background.

Date:

1942

Artist:

Charles White
American, 1918–1979

About this artwork

Like many artists of his generation, Chicagoan Charles White believed that art could be an influential force in the struggle to promote racial equality for African Americans, stating, “Paint is the only weapon I have with which to fight what I resent.” He addressed the quest for dignity and freedom in This, My Brother, which takes its title from a poem by John Rood about a rural miner who experiences a political awakening. In the painting, the man appears to break free from a mountain of rubble, alluding to White’s hope that social change could be realized.

Status

Currently Off View

Department

Arts of the Americas

Artist

Charles White

Title

This, My Brother

Origin

Chicago

Date

1942

Medium

Oil on canvas

Inscriptions

Signed lower right: Charles White 42

Dimensions

61 × 91.4 cm (24 × 36 in.)

Credit Line

Pauline Palmer Prize Fund

Reference Number

1999.224

Copyright

© The Charles White Archives

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email . Information about image downloads and licensing is available here.

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