The Slaying of Red Comyn by Robert the Bruce

A work made of pen and brown iron gall ink, with brush and brown and gray wash, over chalk (recto), and black chalk (verso), on tan laid paper.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of pen and brown iron gall ink, with brush and brown and gray wash, over chalk (recto), and black chalk (verso), on tan laid paper.

Date:

1810–16

Artist:

Henry Fuseli
Swiss, active in England, 1741-1825

About this artwork

Fuseli illustrates the moment immediately after Robert the Bruce kills his rival to the Scottish throne, John “Red” Comyn. This event took place in 1306 in the Franciscan monastery in Dumfries, Scotland. Fuseli places the swaggering Robert front stage, nonchalantly resheathing his sword. In the background, the dying Comyn has collapsed in the arms of the friars.
The figure of Robert—whose exaggerated musculature was inspired by both ancient Roman sculpture and Michelangelo—is seen from slightly below, emphasizing his dominance. Fuseli’s expert use of wash creates brilliant effects of sunlight and cast shadow, increasing the scene’s drama.

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Prints and Drawings

Artist

Henry Fuseli

Title

The Slaying of Red Comyn by Robert the Bruce

Origin

England

Date

1810–1816

Medium

Pen and brown iron gall ink, with brush and brown and gray wash, over chalk (recto), and black chalk (verso), on tan laid paper

Dimensions

315 × 206 mm

Credit Line

Gift of Dorothy Braude Edinburg to the Harry B. and Bessie K. Braude Memorial Collection

Reference Number

2012.78

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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