Shoulder Cauldron with Diagonal Basketry Pattern

A work made of ceramic and pigment.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of ceramic and pigment.

Date:

A.D. 950/1150

Artist:

Hohokam, Sacaton Red-on-buff
Southern Arizona, United States

About this artwork

Pottery making reached the Southwest from western Mexico. By A.D. 300, along the Gila and Salt rivers in the southern Arizona desert, the Hohokam people were building pithouse villages and irrigation canals, slowly changing their way of life from hunting and gathering to a more sedentary existence. They formed ceramic vessels by coiling clay rolls and finished them in the “paddle-and-anvil” technique, supporting the inside of a vessel with a smooth stone or fingers, while working the outer surface with a paddle. Red-painted linear designs appear to derive from older Southwestern basketry weaving; the diagonal pattern on this vessel is created by vertically linked, parallel lines of scrolls.

On View

Arts of the Americas, Gallery 136

Culture

Hohokam

Title

Shoulder Cauldron with Diagonal Basketry Pattern

Origin

Arizona

Date

950 AD–1150

Medium

Ceramic and pigment

Dimensions

25.1 × 41.6 cm (9 7/8 × 16 3/8 in.)

Credit Line

Edward Johnson and Laura T. Magnuson endowments

Reference Number

1993.352

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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