The End of the Trail

A work made of bronze.

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  • A work made of bronze.

Date:

1918

Artist:

James Earle Fraser
American, 1876–1953

About this artwork

The End of the Trail, James Earle Fraser’s best-known sculpture, has come to symbolize the decimation of the Native American population due to westward expansion. In 1893, the year of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, the 15-year-old Fraser, then a student at the School of the Art Institute, produced the first version of this bronze sculpture. (The Art Institute’s sculpture is a later model and cast.) A melancholic commentary on the vanishing Indian, the work portrays an exhausted Sioux drooping over his equally weary pony; both rider and horse have literally—and figuratively—reached the end of the trail.

Currently Off View

American Art

Artist

James Earle Fraser

Title

The End of the Trail

Origin

United States

Date

1918

Medium

Bronze

Dimensions

H.: 111.8 cm (44 in.)

Credit Line

Bequest of Arthur Rubloff Trust

Reference Number

1991.325

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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