Chocolate Jar with Iron-locked Lid

A work made of tin-glazed earthenware.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of tin-glazed earthenware.

Date:

1725/75

Artist:

Talavera poblana
Puebla, Mexico

About this artwork

Talavera poblana, a tin-glazed earthenware, was made in the central Mexican town of Puebla beginning in the sixteenth-century. The name likely refers to the majolica-producing city of Talavera de la Reina in Spain. Talavera emulated the designs of fashionable imported Spanish ceramics; like its Spanish prototypes, it showed the influence of Islamic, Chinese, Italian, and French ceramics, all present in cosmopolitan Spain during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and transmitted to Mexico during the colonial period. This chocolate jar–with an iron cover, collar, and lock–would have been used to store valuable commodities like cacao beans. The blue-and-white ornamentation features panels composed of fringed curtains and scrolled leaves that frame long-tailed birds, a popular motif that may recall Chinese export Swatow ware.

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Arts of the Americas

Artist

Talavera Poblana

Title

Chocolate Jar with Iron-locked Lid

Origin

Puebla

Date

1725–1775

Medium

Tin-glazed earthenware

Dimensions

38.1 × 27.9 cm (15 × 11 in.) [h. 42.6 cm (16 3/4 in.) including key]

Credit Line

Gift of Eva Lewis in memory of her husband, Herbert Pickering Lewis

Reference Number

1923.1537

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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