Man's Kilt and Flap, meant to be used in Buffalo Dance Ceremony

A work made of a: cotton, plain weave; painted and stencilled; edge with split leather and metal tube fringe; plied cotton ties
b: painted leather with metal tube fringe; tied over wood stick with plied cotton ties.

Image actions

  • A work made of a: cotton, plain weave; painted and stencilled; edge with split leather and metal tube fringe; plied cotton ties
b: painted leather with metal tube fringe; tied over wood stick with plied cotton ties.

Date:

1925/50

Artist:

Pueblo
United States, New Mexico, San Felipe

About this artwork

This Man’s Kilt features two painted images of the plumed or horned serpent, a supernatural being associated throughout the southwestern United States with fertile, life-bringing, sacred waters. For the Buffalo Dance a male performer with his upper body painted black would wear this kilt while imitating the movements of the buffalo by using rhythmic and lumbering dance steps. The ceremony remains a popular social dance performed throughout the Rio Grande Pueblos in January; it also serves as a powerful religious ritual that is believed to cleanse the village of misfortunes.

Currently Off View

Textiles

Culture

San Felipe

Title

Man's Kilt and Flap, meant to be used in Buffalo Dance Ceremony

Origin

New Mexico

Date

1926–1950

Medium

a: Cotton, plain weave; painted and stencilled; edge with split leather and metal tube fringe; plied cotton ties b: Painted leather with metal tube fringe; tied over wood stick with plied cotton ties

Dimensions

a: 80.3 × 113.6 cm (31 5/8 × 44 3/4 in.) b: 23.1 × 25.6 cm (9 1/8 × 10 in.)

Credit Line

Restricted gift of the Needlework Friends of Pauline Palmer Wood

Reference Number

1984.998a-b

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

Share

Sign up for our enewsletter to receive updates.

Learn more

Image actions

Share