Weeklong Runs

New print!
BRIGHTON ROCK
1947, John Boulting, UK, 92 min.
With Richard Attenborough, Carol Marsh, Hermione Baddeley

“Terrific...Greene’s movie-friendliness is in full cry.”—Terrence Rafferty, The New York Times

“The best film to capture on celluloid Greene’s seedy world of evil, sin and betrayal.
The casting is impeccable—the most authentic criminal band ever assembled in a British movie.”—Philip French, The Observer

Presented in a new 35mm print, this 1947 classic represents a highpoint in British noir and Graham Greene adaptations. The main ingredients are an utterly ruthless (yet seriously Catholic) 17-year-old gangster, the achingly innocent girl he marries for an alibi, a blowsy music-hall singer (Baddeley) who pursues justice like a hound from hell, and the seaside resort of Brighton, captured in all its sleazy glory by hidden-camera location work. Attenborough’s sensational breakthrough performance as the baby-faced, razor-wielding psychopath Pinkie rivals that of Richard Widmark in KISS OF DEATH as the ultimate film noir portrayal of sheer malevolence. Dissatisfied with Terence Rattigan’s first draft, Greene rewrote the screenplay himself. Lurid noir pyrotechnics jostle with Greene’s Catholic preoccupations, and it all comes together in the tour-de-force twist ending. 35mm. (MR)

August 7—13
Fri. at 6:00 pm only;
Sat. at 3:15 pm, 5:15 pm, and 7:45 pm;
Sun. at 3:00 pm and 5:00 pm;
Mon.-Thu. at 6:00 pm and 8:00 pm

Chicago premiere!
AMERICAN CASINO
2009, Leslie Cockburn, USA, 89 min.

“Searing expose of the subprime mortgage crisis.”—Ronnie Scheib, Variety

“A revelatory howl against the still-gestating, $8 trillion-and-counting financial services industry bailout…with careful but thriller-like exposition of the house of cards built upon the backs of targeted new homeowners.”—Bill Weber, Slant Magazine

If the subject of America’s financial-industry crisis sounds dry, think again, for AMERICAN CASINO is about to take you for a spin around Wall Street’s roulette wheel for an inside look at exactly how big money’s shell game worked, and how it crashed. Director Cockburn, a former 60 Minutes producer, starts at the top with revealing interviews and cynical corporate communiqués from Standard & Poor’s and other firms, detailing how a vast fortune on paper was built largely on the trust of first-time borrowers and minority home buyers. The heart of the crisis is laid bare in the shocking individual stories of the bait-and-switch practices that sent unsuspecting believers in the American dream spiraling into ruin. 35mm. (BS)

Writer Andrew Cockburn will be present for audience discussion following the 7:45 pm show on Friday and the 8:15 pm show on Saturday.

August 14—20
Fri. and Mon.-Thu. at 6:00 pm and 7:45 pm;
Sat. at 3:00 pm, 4:45 pm, 6:30 pm, and 8:15 pm;
Sun. at 3:00 pm and 4:45 pm

VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR
2008, Matt Tyrnauer, USA, 96 min.

“Like the subject’s meticulously constructed gowns, the film has more layers than initially meet the eye.”—Karina Longworth, Time Out New York

“A little like gorging on chocolate and champagne…the film is steeped in the mood of LA DOLCE VITA redux.”—Stephen Holden, The New York Times

In a world where emperors in the political sense have long since fallen, the world of haute couture still provides a throne, albeit an increasingly shaky one, for an imperious arbiter of female fashion the likes of Valentino Garavani, famed for his signature shade of red, and for dressing Jackie Kennedy, Elizabeth Taylor, Gwyneth Paltrow, and scores of starlets, first ladies, and well-heeled wannabes. Director Tyrnauer, a special correspondent for Vanity Fair, gains access to the luxurious inner sanctum, where pug dogs in earrings lie at the master’s feet or cavort for Valentino and Giancarlo Giammetti, his longtime partner and financial wizard. The designer’s over-the-top three-day retirement extravaganza in Rome is his (and the film’s) grand finale, and the featured cream of the fashion world includes Giorgio Armani, Tom Ford, Karl Lagerfeld, Anna Wintour, André Leon Talley, Alek Wek, Donatella Versace, and more, more, and more. 35mm. (BS)

August 21—27
Fri. and Mon.-Thu. at 6:00 pm and 8:00 pm;
Sat. at 3:15 pm, 5:15 pm, and 7:45 pm;
Sun. at 3:15 pm and 5:15 pm

Chicago premiere!
New print!
LE COMBAT DANS L’ÎLE
1962, Alain Cavalier, France, 104 min.
With Jean-Louis Trintignant, Romy Schneider, Henri Serre

“Intriguing and absorbing—and also, thanks to Pierre Lhomme‘s silvery and smoky cinematography and the natural gorgeousness of the cast—beautiful to behold.”—A.O. Scott, The New York Times

“Not to be missed. A subtly committed and beautifully crafted thriller.”—Elliott Stein, Village Voice

The first feature by Alain Cavalier (THÉRÈSE), this recently rediscovered Nouvelle Vague gem forms a fascinating dialogue with Rivette’s PARIS BELONGS TO US and Truffaut’s JULES AND JIM, politicizing the conspiracy-thriller paranoia of the former and the romantic triangulation of the latter. Foreshadowing his fascist arch-creep in THE CONFORMIST, lean and mean Trintignant plays a wealthy right-wing terrorist whose idiosyncrasies include a bazooka in his closet and rough sex with his wife (Schneider at her most ravishing). He uses the bazooka in an assassination attempt on a liberal politician and then flees with his wife to the country home of a pacifist friend (Serre of JULES AND JIM), where romantic rivalry leads to a bizarre showdown. In French with English subtitles. 35mm. (MR)

August 28—September 3
Fri. and Mon.-Thu. at 6:00 pm and 8:00 pm;
Sat. at 3:15 pm, 5:15 pm, and 7:45 pm;
Sun. at 3:15 pm and 5:15 pm