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At the Ryerson & Burnham Libraries

Dankmar Adler papers 

1844-1941. 2 linear foot.
Architect and engineer Dankmar Adler entered into partnership with Louis Sullivan in 1879, with Adler providing the engineering and planning expertise that complemented Sullivan's talent for form, material, and ornament. Before the dissolution of their partnership in 1895, Adler and Sullivan had designed more than one hundred buildings and made significant innovations in steel-frame construction.

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Adler and Sullivan Images
Dankmar Adler Images


Burnham Library-University of Illinois Project to Microfilm Architectural Documentation Daybooks collection

1950-1952. .25 linear foot. 

These daybooks carefully document interviews with architects, draftsman, and building owners—including Sullivan associate George Grant Elmslie, at age eighty— conducted during this project, which sought to microfilm extant architectural drawings by Chicago architects or of Chicago buildings. Many Sullivan projects are mentioned in these interviews, including: Auditorium Building, Chicago, IL; Farmers' and Merchants' Union Bank, Columbus, WI; Garrick Theater; Mason City, IA residence; Methodist-Episcopal Church, Cedar Rapids, IA; National Farmers' Bank; Peoples' Savings and Loan Association, Sidney, OH; Schlesinger and Mayer Store (aka Carson, Pirie, Scott); Union Trust Building, St. Louis, MO; and Wainwright Tomb drawings, St. Louis, MO. Also discussed is Sullivan's relationship with Frank Lloyd Wright. 

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Barbara Crane collection

1972-1979. 2 linear feet. 

From 1972 to 1979, Crane was commissioned by the Chicago Commission on Historical and Architectural Landmarks (currently known as the Commission on Chicago Landmarks) to photograph Chicago buildings being evaluated for possible landmark designation. Crane photographed numerous Chicago neighborhoods, capturing many pre-war commercial buildings and residences before the current trend of teardowns and extensive remodelings, including various works of Louis Sullivan and the Adler and Sullivan firm.

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The Historic Architecture and Landscape Image collection

c.1865-1973 (bulk 1890-1930). 

Consisting of approximately 11,000 images that document the architecture, landscape and urban planning of sites across the United States—with a particular emphasis on Chicago and its suburbs—and, to a lesser extent, internationally, The Historic Architecture and Landscape Image collection, or HALIC, contains nearly 400 mounted photographic prints and lantern slides of Sullivan buildings dating from the late 1800s to the 1950s.

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Images


Ralph Marlowe Line collection

1944-1960. .5 linear foot. 

An avid scholar of architect Louis Sullivan, Line was an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. Line's writings and photographs about Sullivan were most notably published in the 1956 reprint of Sullivan's literary masterwork, The Autobiography of an Idea. This collection includes Line's photographs of buildings and ornament designed by Louis Sullivan. Most of the images are of projects in the Midwest, although there are representative images from across the United States. 

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Richard Nickel archive

1850-2011. 76 linear feet. 

The Richard Nickel Archive includes approximately 15,000 negatives, photographs, contact sheets, items of correspondence, documents, architectural drawings and reproductions, digital image files, realia, and other effects, including Nickel’s personal library. The central focus of the Nickel Archive is the photographs and historical files pertaining to the architecture of Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan, known during their partnership from 1880 to 1895 as Adler & Sullivan Architects. The collection also highlights the individual projects of both Adler and Sullivan separately after 1895. In addition to the material related to Adler and Sullivan and the architects of the Chicago School, the collection is particularly rich in the work of the Prairie School and Second Chicago School architectural movements.

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Prairie School Press archives

1961-1981. 16.5 linear feet. 

In 1961 Wilbert and Marilyn Hasbrouck established the Prairie School Press in Chicago to publish important but out-of-print architecture sources on or by the Prairie School architects. They issued facsimile editions of numerous titles, including Louis Sullivan's A System of Architectural Ornament According with a Philosophy of Man's Powers, and The House Beautiful, illustrated by Frank Lloyd Wright. The Hasbroucks' journal, The Prairie School Review, published from 1964 to 1981, was the earliest scholarly journal to feature illustrated articles on various Prairie School projects, reviews of current publications, and preservation news. The collection includes manuscripts, photographs, and other materials relating to several Sullivan buildings.

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John D. Randall papers, 1884-1993. 

1 linear foot. 

Champion of Dankmar Adler and Louis H. Sullivan's Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York, and the Wainwright Building in St. Louis, Missouri, John D. Randall was a prominent Chicago architect, author, and preservationist. A graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and a student of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Randall led campaigns to save important works of Louis Sullivan's architecture in Chicago and throughout the United States. In the 1990s, Randall was also the author of a revised and expanded edition of his father Frank D. Randall's comprehensive History of the Development of Building Construction in Chicago. This collection is comprised of Randall's writings, correspondence, photographs, and miscellaneous publications.

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Crombie Taylor papers, 1914-1999. 

4 linear feet. 

Champion of Dankmar Adler and Louis H. Sullivan's Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York, and the Wainwright Building in St. Louis, Missouri, John D. Randall was a prominent Chicago architect, author, and preservationist. A graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and a student of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Randall led campaigns to save important works of Louis Sullivan's architecture in Chicago and throughout the United States. In the 1990s, Randall was also the author of a revised and expanded edition of his father Frank D. Randall's comprehensive History of the Development of Building Construction in Chicago. This collection is comprised of Randall's writings, correspondence, photographs, and miscellaneous publications.

Known as an architect, design educator and preservationist who championed the work of Louis H. Sullivan, this collection documents both Crombie's own designs as well as his Sullivan-related studies. The latter group includes stencils, wallpapers, drawings, photographs, and paper files.

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