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Rembrandt's Journey

February 14, 2004–May 9, 2004
Regenstein Hall

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–1669) is one of the most celebrated artists in history. With more than 200 works from all periods of his long career—20 paintings, 33 drawings, 153 prints, and 7 copper plates taken from major collections here and abroad—this is the first American exhibition to explore Rembrandt’s astonishing range and variety of activity as a brilliant etcher seen in the context of his paintings and drawings. Rembrandt’s Journey highlights the parallel relationships among the master’s paintings, drawings, and prints—closely examining imagery, narrative content, and the marks of the artist’s hand, as well as his approach to religious illustration in all of the media he mastered and reinvented. A closer study of the expressions, gestures, and body language of his figures will provide deeper insight into the inventive, subtle, and complex way he interpreted biblical texts and imaginatively projected himself into them. The exhibition will focus on several of the subjects to which Rembrandt returned—portraits and self-portraits, everyday life, landscape, the nude—at various stages of his career.