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Architecture to Scale: Stanley Tigerman and Zago Architecture

Thursday, June 26, 2014Sunday, September 14, 2014
Galleries 283–285

As concepts are developed and represented across a range of scales, an architect's work requires a variety of approaches, media, and outputs. Architecture to Scale demonstrates the complex architectural processes from research to production through the work of two groundbreaking architects in adjacent installations: a selection of architectural models by Stanley Tigerman and Zago Architecture’s series of monumental films, XYT: Detroit Streets.

Since founding his architectural practice in 1962, Stanley Tigerman has been a major figure in Chicago’s postmodern architecture movement. Tigerman has covered vast territory while developing a multifaceted critique of history, the architectural profession, and even his own personal narrative. The diverse array of models in this exhibition—from single-family homes to religious institutions—illustrates his formal sophistication and conceptual rigor while showing how his ideas about irony, religion, and humor manifest themselves in architectural form.

Taking a much different and exponentially larger form is Zago Architecture’s film series XYT: Detroit Streets, created as a research project in 2008. Founded by Andrew Zago in 1991, Zago Architecture employs a rigorous practice of research and experimentation in parallel to its architecture projects. With XYT: Detroit Streets, the mechanics of representation have been expanded and exaggerated in order to capture the essence of the contemporary urban condition as seen in Detroit. This exhibition also highlights how the firm’s research on representation has influenced the development of its architecture projects.

From the micro to the macro, architects rely on scale in order to articulate and present their projects, and this exhibition demonstrates unique architectural approaches through the contrasting scales of Stanley Tigerman and Zago Architecture.