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Artist Talk: Yuri Suzuki

February 13, 2018
6:00PM7:00PM
Rubloff Auditorium
Free, no registration required

Yuri Suzuki introduces his work, which looks into the relationship between sound and people and explores how music and sound affect the mind.

Presented in partnership with the Architecture & Design Society and SAIC's Visiting Artists Program and the William Bronson and Grayce Slovet Mitchell Lecture Series in the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects.


About the artist

Yuri Suzuki is a London-based sound artist, designer, and electronic musician who explores the realms of sound through exquisitely designed pieces. His work looks into the relationship between sound and people and explores how music and sound affect their minds. His sound, art, and installations have been exhibited all over the world.

After studying industrial design at Nihon University, Suzuki worked for the Japanese art unit Maywa Denki, which created the Otamatone. He then moved to London to study design products at the Royal College of Art under the tutelage of Ron Arad. During this period, he also worked with Yamaha to produce musical experiences.

In 2013 Suzuki started teaching at Royal College of Art and became a research consultant for Disney, New Radiophonic Workshop, and Teenage Engineering.

During this same year, he set up Yuri Suzuki Design Studio, focusing on research and development and consultancy work in sound and design. His clients include Google, Moog, will.i.am, and Panasonic, to name a few.

Also in 2013, Suzuki created a DIY musical instrument called the Ototo, a musical invention kit which allows anyone to create their own electronic musical instrument, with Mark McKeague and Joseph Pleass as Dentaku Ltd. In 2014, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, acquired Ototo as well as Suzuki’s Colour Chaser for its permanent collection.


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