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Hemingway and the Art Institute

Have you ever thought about who, living or dead, you would invite to your dinner party? What about who would you take to the museum with you? What new insights and discoveries might these “friends” bring to you? I love to think about this and while my imaginary guests may change over time, a name that comes up frequently is Ernest Hemingway. I've always been interested in both his writings and his life and would jump at the chance to take a stroll through the galleries with this larger-than-life author. And while this might be impossible, since Hemingway had a lot to say about everything (including art), we're able to make some educated guesses at what he might have been drawn to at the museum. So in that spirit, tomorrow I'll be leading a tour that will not just seek out works that Hemingway explicitly spoke of, but also connect with those that embody the spirit of his work. What can you expect to see? We’ll see some works he saw as a young boy from Oak Park. We’ll see modern masters that he personally knew while living in Paris. We’ll consider what the connection was between his eye and his pen, when he said things like “I can make a landscape like Cézanne." If you're interested in hearing more about connections between Hemingway and the museum, the gallery talk starts at 12:00p.m. tomorrow in the museum's Modern Wing. It, like all of our daily gallery talks, is free with museum admission. —P.D. Young, Production Coordinator, Imaging Department

Paul Cézanne. The Bay of Marseilles, Seen from L'Estaque, c. 1885. Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson Collection.