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Work of the Week: Labor Day Edition

 

kalisher

It's easy to consider Labor Day, and the three-day weekend it allows, as our given right: a reward at the end of summer prepping us for the coming winter, and a logical bookend complementing Memorial Day. We barbecue, sleep in on a Monday, and get back to work. Backyard parties aren't really a great justification for a holiday, though, and Labor Day's roots are much more serious. I won't go into events like Chicago's Haymarket Riot or the tradition of child labor, but we have it better than our ancestors—three-day weekends or not.

Which brings me to our Work of the Week: a photograph by Simpson Kalisher, A Brakeman Rides a String of Cars Down a Hump. "What does this have to do with my pool party?" you're asking. Well, employers could once set the length of their workers' days—twelve hours was common. In 1916, though, with a railroad workers' strike looming, Congress negotiated with a committee of railroad labor brotherhoods and enacted the Adamson Act. We have the Adamson Act to thank for the concept of the eight-hour workday and time-and-a-half overtime pay. The idea of capping workers' hours was not new—the "short-time movement" goes back to the Industrial Revolution—but this was the first time the U.S. Government regulated by law the hours of private workers' days.

Give that some thought when you get back to work on Tuesday, whether you sit in an office or hang off the back of train cars.

Image Credit: Simpson Kalisher. A Brakeman Rides a String of Cars Down the Hump, n.d. Restricted gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Galter.