Resources tagged photography

Displaying records 61 - 70 of 172.
One of the few women photographers in Japan in the 1970s was Miyako Ishiuchi. In her 1977 series Yokosuka Story, she returns to her hometown Yokosuka, also the home of a U.S. naval base...
2. Ishiuchi, Miyako. <em>Sweet Home Yokosuka 1976-1980</em>. New York: PPP Editions in association with Andrew Roth, Inc., 2010, [unpaginated].
Kikuji Kawada's dream of a stain on the ceiling of the Hiroshima Prefecture Industrial Promotion Hall (commonly called the Atomic Bomb Dome) led to his photobook The Map. In the book,...
2. Kikuji Kawada. <em>The Map = Chizu</em>. Tucson, Arizona, Nazraeli Press, 2005, [p.15-16 (inside fold)].
The greatest impact of Provoke was not stylistic, but that it brought self-expression into photography. Nobuyoshi Araki described Provoke as "like a bomb... I was jealous, I wanted...
2. Nobuyoshi Araki. <em>Sentimental Journey in The Japanese Box: Facsimile Reprint of Six Rare Photographic Publications of the Provoke Era</em>. Paris: Edition 7L; Göttingen: distributed by Steidl Publishers, 2001, [p.78-79].
Yutaka Takanashi was already an established photographer when he joined Provoke. He joined the group partly because of Nakahira's charismatic persuasion and partly because, as he said, "...
2. Yutaka Takanashi. <em>Toshi-e</em>.  Tokyo: Takanashi Yutaka; Hatsubaimoto Izara Shob&#333;, 1974; [p.63], hardback.
The third issue (August, 1969) was printed on rougher paper to emphasize the bure, boke photography. Takanashi's disconcerting pictures of fashionable young people now had no context, and on...
3. <em>Purov&#333;ku: shis&#333; no tame no ch&#333;hatsuteki shiry&#333; (Provoke No. 3) </em>. Tokyo, Purov&#333;ku-sha, 1969, [p.22-23].
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