Related Story: VIEW Brâncusi in His Studio
From the Closer Look in the Art Institute of Chicago app, available for iOS devices through the iTunes Store.

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Brâncusi at work in his studio with an alternate version of Golden Bird, early 1922. © CNAC / MNAM / Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY, Paris.

Brâncusi treated his studio as a work of art in its own right. He first rented a small loft in Paris’s 15th arrondissement in 1916; by 1941 he had four additions to the original studio. There the artist spent years arranging, rearranging, and photographing his sculptures, seeking an ideally balanced totality from a variety of angles. Visitors to the studio described it in mystical, awe-inspiring terms. According to fellow artist Man Ray, entering it was like “penetrating into another world.” In 1956, the year before his death, Brâncusi bequeathed his studio to the French state with the stipulation that it be reconstructed just as he left it. Keep an eye out for works from the Art Institute’s collection, including Golden Bird and Leda.



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View of Brâncusi’s Studio showing Mlle Pogany II and Golden Bird, 1920.




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Brâncusi at work in his studio with an alternate version of Golden Bird, early 1922.




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View of Brâncusi’s studio showing Leda and Head, about 1923.




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Aerial view of Brâncusi’s studio, about 1925.




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View of Brâncusi’s studio with Endless Column, Fish, and The Sorceress, 1925.