Lunch at the Restaurant Fournaise (The Rowers' Lunch)

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir
French, 1841-1919

Lunch at the Restaurant Fournaise (The Rowers' Lunch), 1875

Oil on canvas
55 x 65.9 cm (21 5/8 x 25 15/16 in.)
Inscribed at lower left: Renoir
Potter Palmer Collection, 1922.437

This work is featured in the online catalogue Renoir Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, the second volume in the Art Institute’s scholarly digital series on the Impressionist circle. The catalogue offers in-depth curatorial and technical entries on 25 artworks by Pierre-Auguste Renoir in museum’s collection; entries feature interactive and layered high-resolution imaging, previously unpublished technical photographs, archival materials, and documentation relating to each artwork.

Exhibition, Publication and Ownership Histories

Exhibition History

Paris, 11, rue Le Peletier, 2e exposition de peinture [second Impressionist exhibition], Apr. 1876, cat. 221, as Déjeûner chez Fournaise.

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings from the Collection of Mrs. Potter Palmer, May 10–Nov. 1910, cat. 51, as Breakfast by the river.

Art Institute of Chicago, “A Century of Progress”: Loan Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture, May 23–Nov. 1, 1933, cat. 350.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, Manet and Renoir, Nov. 29, 1933–Jan. 1, 1934, no cat. no. (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, “A Century of Progress”: Loan Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture for 1934, June 1–Oct. 31, 1934, cat. 239.

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Independent Painters of Nineteenth Century Paris, Mar. 15–Apr. 28, 1935, cat. 45 (ill.).

Arts Club of Chicago, Origins of Modern Art, Apr. 2–30, 1940, cat. 13.

Birmingham (Ala.) Museum of Art, Opening Exhibition, Apr. 8–June 3, 1951, no cat. no. (ill.).

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Apr. 4–May 18, 1952, no cat.

New York, Wildenstein, Olympia’s Progeny: French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Paintings (1865–1905); Loan Exhibition for the Benefit of the Association for Mentally Ill Children in Manhattan, Inc., Oct. 28–Nov. 27, 1965, cat. 23 (ill.).

Milwaukee Art Center, The Inner Circle, Sept. 15–Oct. 23, 1966, cat. 81 (ill.).

Portland (Ore.) Art Museum, 75 Masterworks: An Exhibition of Paintings in Honor of the Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the Portland Art Association, 1892–1967, Dec. 12, 1967–Jan. 21, 1968, cat. 13 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings by Renoir, Feb. 3–Apr. 1, 1973, cat. 28 (ill.).

Manchester, N.H., Currier Gallery of Art, Feb. 18–May 28, 1975, no cat.

Pasadena, Calif., Norton Simon Museum of Art, Jan. 27–Oct. 31, 1978, no cat.

Albi, Musée Toulouse-Lautrec, Trésors impressionnistes du Musée de Chicago, June 27–Aug. 31, 1980, cat. 21 (ill.).

London, Hayward Gallery, Renoir, Jan. 30–Apr. 21, 1985, cat. 48 (ill.); Paris, Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, May 14–Sept. 2, 1985, cat. 47 (ill.); Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Oct. 9, 1985–Jan. 5, 1986.

Art Institute of Chicago, Tour de France: Paintings, Photographs, Prints, and Drawings from the Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, Dec. 9, 1989–Mar. 4, 1990, no cat. no. (ill.).

Washington, D.C., Phillips Collection, Impressionists on the Seine: A Celebration of Renoir’s “Luncheon of the Boating Party,” Sept. 21, 1996–Feb. 23, 1997, cat. 40 (ill.).

Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, Renoir’s Portraits: Impressions of an Age, June 27–Sept. 14, 1997, not in cat.; Art Institute of Chicago, Oct. 17, 1997–Jan. 4, 1998; Fort Worth, Tex., Kimbell Art Museum, Feb. 8–Apr. 26, 1998 (Chicago only).

Amsterdam, Van Gogh Museum, Theo van Gogh (1857–1891): Art Dealer, Collector, and Brother of Vincent, June 24–Sept. 5, 1999, cat. 125 (ill.); Paris, Musée d’Orsay, Sept. 27, 1999–Jan. 9, 2000.

Art Institute of Chicago, Seurat and the Making of “La Grande Jatte,” June 16–Sept. 19, 2004, cat. 107 (ill.).

London, National Gallery, Renoir Landscapes, 1865–1883, Feb. 21–May 20, 2007, cat. 34 (ill.); Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, June 8–Sept. 9, 2007; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Oct. 4, 2007–Jan. 6, 2008.

Fort Worth, Tex., Kimbell Art Museum, The Impressionists: Master Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago, June 29–Nov. 2, 2008, cat. 23 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, A Case for Wine: From King Tut to Today, July 11–Sept. 20, 2009, no cat.

Kunstmuseum Basel, Renoir: Between Bohemia and Bourgeoisie; The Early Years, Apr. 1–Aug. 12, 2012, cat. 40 (ill.).

Publication History

Catalogue de la 2e exposition de peinture, exh. cat. (Alcan-Lévy, 1876), p. 21, cat. 221.

Émile Porcheron, “Promenades d’un flâneur: Les impressionnistes,” Le soleil, Apr. 4, 1876, pp. 2–3.

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings from the Collection of Mrs. Potter Palmer, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1910), cat. 51.

Art Institute of Chicago, “Library Notes,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 15, 5 (Sep.–Oct. 1921), p. 161 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, Handbook of Sculpture, Architecture, and Paintings, pt. 2, Paintings (Art Institute of Chicago, 1922), p. 69, cat. 844.

Art Institute of Chicago, “Accessions and Loans,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 16, 3 (May 1922), p. 47.

Art Institute of Chicago, A Guide to the Paintings in the Permanent Collection (Art Institute of Chicago, 1925), pp. 67 (ill.); 150, cat. 844.

M. C., “Renoirs in the Institute,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 19, 3 (Mar. 1925), p. 33 (ill.).

Julius Meier-Graefe, Renoir (Klinkhardt & Biermann, 1929), p. 124, no. 102 (ill.).

Reginald Howard Wilenski, French Painting (Hale, Cushman & Flint, 1931), p. 262.

Daniel Catton Rich, “The Mrs. L. L. Coburn Collection,” in Exhibition of the Mrs. L. L. Coburn Collection: Modern Paintings and Watercolors, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1932), p. 7.

Art Institute of Chicago, Catalogue of “A Century of Progress”: Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture; Lent from American Collections, ed. Daniel Catton Rich, 3rd ed., exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1933), p. 50, cat. 350.

Daniel Catton Rich, “Französische Impressionisten im Art Institute zu Chicago,” Pantheon: Monatsschrift für Freunde und Sammler der Kunst 11, 3 (Mar. 1933), pp. 77–78. Translated by C. C. H. Drechsel as “French Impressionists in the Art Institute of Chicago,” Pantheon/Cicerone (Mar. 1933), p. 18.

Art Institute of Chicago, “The Rearrangement of the Paintings Galleries,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 27, 7 (Dec. 1933), p. 115.

Pennsylvania Museum of Art, “Manet and Renoir,” Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin 29, 158 (Dec. 1933), pp. 16 (ill.), 19.

Art Institute of Chicago, Catalogue of “A Century of Progress”: Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture, 1934, ed. Daniel Catton Rich, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1934), p. 40, cat. 239.

“Fourteen Notable Modern Paintings,” Fortune 9 (Jan. 1934), p. 33 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, A Brief Illustrated Guide to the Collections (Art Institute of Chicago, 1935), p. 28.

George Harold Edgell, Independent Painters of Nineteenth Century Paris, exh. cat. (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1935), pp. 30, cat. 45; 73 (ill.).

Arts Club of Chicago, Origins of Modern Art, exh. cat. (Arts Club of Chicago, 1940), cat. 13.

Reginald Howard Wilenski, Modern French Painters (Reynal & Hitchcook, [1940]), p. 338.

Art Institute of Chicago, “The United States Now an Art Publishing Center,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 36, 2 (Feb. 1942), p. 30.

Frederick A. Sweet, “Potter Palmer and the Painting Department,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 37, 6 (Nov. 1943), p. 86.

Art Institute of Chicago, An Illustrated Guide to the Collections of the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago, 1945), p. 36.

Birmingham (Ala.) Museum of Art, Catalogue of the Opening Exhibition, exh. cat. (Birmingham Museum of Art, 1951), cover (ill.), p. 31.

Dorothy Bridaham, Renoir in the Art Institute of Chicago (Conzett & Huber, 1954), pl. 4.

Art Institute of Chicago, “The Artist Looks at People,” Art Institute of Chicago Quarterly 52, 4 (Dec. 1, 1958), p. 100.

Raymond Cogniat, Le siècle des impressionnistes (Flammarion, 1959), cover (ill.).

Ishbel Ross, Silhouette in Diamonds: The Life of Mrs. Potter Palmer (Harper & Bros., 1960), p. 155.

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings in the Art Institute of Chicago: A Catalogue of the Picture Collection (Art Institute of Chicago, 1961), pp. 292 (ill.), 396.

Kermit S. Champa, “Olympia’s Progeny,” in Wildenstein, Olympia’s Progeny: French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Paintings (1865–1905); Loan Exhibition for the Benefit of the Association for Mentally Ill Children in Manhattan, Inc., exh. cat. (Wildenstein, 1965), n.pag.

Wildenstein, Olympia’s Progeny: French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Paintings (1865–1905); Loan Exhibition for the Benefit of the Association for Mentally Ill Children in Manhattan, Inc., exh. cat. (Wildenstein, 1965), cat. 23 (ill.).

J. M., “Art Israel: 26 Painters and Sculptors,” Calendar of the Art Institute of Chicago 59, 3 (May 1965), p. 8 (detail).

Milwaukee Art Center, The Inner Circle, exh. cat. (Milwaukee Art Center/Arrow, 1966), cat. 81 (ill.).

Charles C. Cunningham, Instituto de arte de Chicago, El mundo de los museos 2 (Editorial Codex, 1967), pp. 11, ill. 31; 58, fig. 1.

Portland (Ore.) Art Museum, 75 Masterworks: An Exhibition of Paintings in Honor of the Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the Portland Art Association, 1892–1967, exh. cat. (Portland Art Museum/Graphic Arts Center, [1967]), cat. 13 (ill.).

André Parinaud and Charles C. Cunningham, Art Institute of Chicago, Grands Musées 2 (Hachette-Filipacchi, 1969), pp. 36, fig. 1; 69, no. 31 (ill.).

Charles C. Cunningham and Satoshi Takahashi, Shikago bijutsukan [Art Institute of Chicago], Museums of the World 32 (Kodansha, 1970), pp. 47, pl. 33; 159.

William Gaunt, Impressionism: A Visual History (Praeger, 1970), pp. 236–37, pl. 91.

William Gaunt, The Impressionists (Thames & Hudson, 1970), pp. 236–37, pl. 91; 242; 291.

John Maxon, The Art Institute of Chicago (Abrams, 1970), p. 86 (ill.).

François Daulte, Auguste Renoir: Catalogue raisonné de l’oeuvre peint, vol. 1, Figures, 1860–1890 (Durand-Ruel, 1971), pp. 232–33, cat. 305 (ill.).

Elda Fezzi, L’opera completa di Renoir: Nel periodo impressionista, 1869–1883, Classici dell’arte 59 (Rizzoli, 1972), pp. 65, pl. IL; 108–09, cat. 452 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings by Renoir, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1973), pp. 24; 84–85, cat. 28 (ill.).

John Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1248 (Jan. 1973), cover (detail); pp. 13, fig. 7; 14; 15.

John Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists—II,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1249 (Feb. 1973), p. 103.

Mike Samuels and Nancy Samuels, Seeing with the Mind’s Eye: The History, Techniques, and Uses of Visualization (Random House, 1975), p. 71 (ill.).

Walter Pach, Auguste Renoir: Leben und Werk (M. DuMont Schauberg, 1976), pp. 115, fig. 51; 173.

Art Institute of Chicago, 100 Masterpieces (Art Institute of Chicago, 1978), pp. 20; 100–01, pl. 56.

Musée Toulouse-Lautrec and Art Institute of Chicago, Trésors impressionnistes du Musée de Chicago, exh. cat. (Musée Toulouse-Lautrec, 1980), pp. 15, no. 21 (ill.); 68.

Art Institute of Chicago, “Subscription Series,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 74, 1 (Jan.–Mar. 1980), p. 18 (ill.).

Joel Isaacson, “Impressionism and Journalistic Illustration,” Arts Magazine 56, 10 (June 1982), p. 105, fig. 37.

Hayward Gallery, Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Paris, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Renoir, exh. cat. (Réunion des Musées Nationaux, 1985), pp. 166–67, cat. 47 (ill.); 168.

Hayward Gallery, Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Paris, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Renoir, exh. cat. (Arts Council of Great Britain, 1985), pp. 94, no. 48 (ill.); 216, no. 48 (ill.); 217.

Denys Sutton, “Renoir’s Kingdom,” Apollo 121, 278 (Apr. 1985), pp. 244; 247, fig. 8.

Charles S. Moffett, ed., with the assistance of Ruth Berson, Barbara Lee Williams, and Fronia E. Wissman, The New Painting: Impressionism, 1874–1886, exh. cat. (Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 1986), p. 164.

Richard R. Brettell, French Impressionists (Art Institute of Chicago/Abrams, 1987), pp. 30–31 (detail), 32 (ill.), 119.

Françoise Cachin and Bogomila Welsh-Ovcharov, with the assistance of Monique Nonne, Van Gogh à Paris, exh. cat. (Réunion des Musées Nationaux, 1988), p. 375 (ill.).

Robert L. Herbert, Impressionism: Art, Leisure, and Parisian Society (Yale University Press, 1988), cover (ill.); pp. 246–47, pl. 250; 253.

Raffaele De Grada, Renoir (Giorgio Mondadori, 1989), p. 72, pl. 49.

Gloria Groom and J. Russell Harris, Tour de France: Paintings, Photographs, Prints, and Drawings from the Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1989), fig. 8.

Sophie Monneret, Renoir, Profils de l’art (Chêne, 1989), p. 78, fig. 1.

Martha Kapos, ed., The Impressionists: A Retrospective (Hugh Lauter Levin/Macmillan, 1991), p. 183, pl. 55.

Russell Ash and Bernard Higton, eds., The Impressionists’ River: Views of the Seine (Universe, 1992), p. 12 (ill.).

James Yood, Feasting: A Celebration of Food in Art; Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago/Universe, 1992), pp. 15 (detail); 50–51, pl. 16.

Anne Distel, “Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Luncheon (Le déjeuner),” in Richard J. Wattenmaker et al., Great French Paintings from the Barnes Foundation: Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, and Early Modern(Knopf/Lincoln University Press, 1993), p. 54, fig. 1.

Anne Distel, Renoir: “Il faut embellir,” Découvertes Gallimard: Peinture 177 (Gallimard/Réunion des Musées Nationaux, 1993), pp. 73 (detail), 169. Translated by Lory Frankel as Renoir: A Sensuous Vision (Thames & Hudson, 1995), pp. 73 (detail), 169.

Art Institute of Chicago, Treasures of 19th- and 20th-Century Painting: The Art Institute of Chicago, with an introduction by James N. Wood (Art Institute of Chicago/Abbeville, 1993), pp. 10, 64 (ill.).

Gerhard Gruitrooy, Renoir: A Master of Impressionism (Todtri, 1994), pp. 47 (ill.), 49, 73.

Tom Frederickson, Culinary Art: Recipes from Great Chicago Restaurants Illustrated with Works of Art from the Collections of the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago, 1995), p. 17 (ill.).

Ruth Berson, ed., The New Painting: Impressionism, 1874–1886; Documentation, vol. 1, Reviews (Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco/University of Washington Press, 1996), pp. 51, 103.

Ruth Berson, ed., The New Painting: Impressionism, 1874–1886; Documentation, vol. 2, Exhibited Works (Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco/University of Washington Press, 1996), pp. 44–45, 63 (ill.).

Francesca Castellani, Pierre-Auguste Renoir: La vita e l’opera (Mondadori, 1996), p. 129 (ill.).


Stephen Kern, Eyes of Love: The Gaze in English and French Paintings and Novels, 1840–1900 (Reaktion, 1996), pp. 59, ill. 25; 60.

Eliza E. Rathbone, “Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party: Tradition and the New,” in Eliza E. Rathbone, Katherine Rothkopf, Richard R. Brettell, and Charles S. Moffett, Impressionists on the Seine: A Celebration of Renoir’s “Luncheon of the Boating Party,” exh. cat. (Phillips Collection/Counterpoint, 1996), p. 32.

Eliza E. Rathbone, Katherine Rothkopf, Richard R. Brettell, and Charles S. Moffett, Impressionists on the Seine: A Celebration of Renoir’s “Luncheon of the Boating Party,” exh. cat. (Phillips Collection/Counterpoint, 1996), pp. 198, pl. 40; 258.

Katherine Rothkopf, “From Argenteuil to Bougival: Life and Leisure on the Seine, 1868–1882,” in Eliza E. Rathbone, Katherine Rothkopf, Richard R. Brettell, and Charles S. Moffett, Impressionists on the Seine: A Celebration of Renoir’s “Luncheon of the Boating Party,” exh. cat. (Phillips Collection/Counterpoint, 1996), p. 73.

Colin B. Bailey, with the assistance of John B. Collins, Renoir’s Portraits: Impressions of an Age, exh. cat. (National Gallery of Canada/Yale University Press, 1997), pp. 186; 308, n. 8. Translated by Danielle Chaput and Julie Desgagné, with support from Nada Kerpan for the texts by Linda Nochlin, as Les portraits de Renoir: Impressions d’une époque, exh. cat. (Gallimard/Musée des Beaux-Arts du Canada, 1997), pp. 186; 308, n. 8.

Douglas W. Druick, Renoir, Artists in Focus (Art Institute of Chicago/Abrams, 1997), pp. 6; 8 (detail); 27–28; 30; 35; 47–48; 59; 72; 83, pl. 2; 109.

Charlotte Gere and Marina Vaizey, Great Woman Collectors (Philip Wilson/Abrams, 1999), p. 133.

Kawamura Memorial Museum of Art, Miyagi Museum of Art, and Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Runowāru ten/Renoir: Modern Eyes, exh. cat. (Hokkaido Shinbunsha, 1999), p. 185, fig. 5.

Chris Stolwijk and Richard Thomson, with a contribution by Sjraar van Heugten, Theo van Gogh (1857–1891): Art Dealer, Collector, and Brother of Vincent, exh. cat. (Van Gogh Museum/Waanders, 1999), p. 216, cat. 125.

Richard Thomson, “Theo van Gogh: An Honest Broker,” in Chris Stolwijk and Richard Thomson, with a contribution by Sjraar van Heugten, Theo van Gogh (1857–1891): Art Dealer, Collector, and Brother of Vincent, exh. cat. (Van Gogh Museum/Waanders, 1999), pp. 123; 125, cat. 125 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism in the Art Institute of Chicago, selected by James N. Wood (Art Institute of Chicago/Hudson Hills, 2000), pp. 9, 43, 45 (ill.), 50, 71, 77.

Gilles Néret, Renoir: Painter of Happiness, 1841–1919, trans. Josephine Bacon (Taschen, 2001), p. 130 (ill.).

Sylvie Patin, L’impressionisme (Bibliothèque des Arts, 2002), p. 119.

Christie’s, London, Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale, sale cat. (Christie’s, Feb. 3, 2003), p. 31 (ill.).

Robert L. Herbert et al., Seurat and the Making of “La Grande Jatte,” exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago/University of California Press, 2004), pp. 112, cat. 107 (ill.); 113; 277.

Norio Shimada, Inshoha bijutsukan [The history of Impressionism] (Shogakukan, 2004), pp. 144–45 (ill.).

Eleanor Dwight, ed., The Letters of Pauline Palmer: A Great Lady of Chicago’s First Family (M. T. Train/Scala, 2005), pp. 301, 302–03 (ill.).

Kyoko Kagawa, Runowaru [Pierre-Auguste Renoir], Seiyo kaiga no kyosho [Great masters of Western art] 4 (Shogakukan, 2006), p. 70 (ill.).

Colin B. Bailey, “‘The Greatest Luminosity, Colour, and Harmony’: Renoir’s Landscapes, 1862–1883,” in Renoir Landscapes, 1865–1883, ed. Colin B. Bailey and Christopher Riopelle, exh. cat. (National Gallery, London, 2007), pp. 58, fig. 38; 59. Translated as Colin B. Bailey, “‘Un maximum de luminosité; de coloration, et d’harmonie”: Les paysages de Renoir, 1862–1883,” in Les paysages de Renoir, 1865–1883, ed. Colin B. Bailey and Christopher Riopelle, trans. Marie-Françoise Dispa, Lise-Éliane Pomier, and Laura Meijer, exh. cat. (National Gallery, London/5 Continents, 2007), pp. 58, fig. 38; 59.

Colin B. Bailey and Christopher Riopelle, eds., Renoir Landscapes, 1865–1883, exh. cat. (National Gallery, London, 2007), pp. 168; 170–71, cat. 34 (ill.); 210; 214. Translated by Marie-Françoise Dispa, Lise-Éliane Pomier, and Laura Meijer as Les paysages de Renoir, 1865–1883, exh. cat. (National Gallery, London/5 Continents, 2007), pp. 168; 170–71, cat. 34 (ill.); 210; 214.

Guy-Patrice Dauberville and Michel Dauberville, with the collaboration of Camille Frémontier-Murphy, Renoir: Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles, vol. 1, 1858–1881 (Bernheim-Jeune, 2007), p. 262, cat. 218 (ill.).

Robert McDonald Parker, “Topographical Chronology 1860–1883,” in Renoir Landscapes, 1865–1883, ed. Colin B. Bailey and Christopher Riopelle, exh. cat. (National Gallery, London, 2007), p. 275. Translated as Robert McDonald Parker, “Chronologie,” in Les paysages de Renoir, 1865–1883, ed. Colin B. Bailey and Christopher Riopelle, trans. Marie-Françoise Dispa, Lise-Éliane Pomier, and Laura Meijer, exh. cat. (National Gallery, London/5 Continents, 2007), p. 275.

Peter Bürger, “Media Differences: Caillebotte and Maupassant as Storytellers,” in Anne Birgitte Fonsmark, Dorothee Hansen, and Gry Hedin, Gustave Caillebotte, exh. cat. (Hatje Cantz, 2008), pp. 24; 25, fig. 3.

Gloria Groom and Douglas Druick, with the assistance of Dorota Chudzicka and Jill Shaw, The Impressionists: Master Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago/Kimbell Art Museum, 2008), cover (detail); pp. 20 (ill.); 64–65, cat. 23 (ill.); 73; 111. Simultaneously published as Gloria Groom and Douglas Druick, with the assistance of Dorota Chudzicka and Jill Shaw, The Age of Impressionism at the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago/Yale University Press, 2008), front cover (detail); pp. 20 (ill.); 64–65, cat. 23 (ill.); 73; 111.

Anne Distel, Renoir (Citadelles & Mazenod, 2009), pp. 118–19, ill. 101; 190; 192.

Adrien Goetz, Comment Regarder . . . Renoir (Hazan, 2009), pp. 160–61 (ill.).

John House, The Genius of Renoir: Paintings from the Clark, with an essay by James A. Ganz, exh. cat. (Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute/Museo Nacional del Prado/Yale University Press, 2010), p. 59.

John House, “Catalogue 4: Luncheon (Le Déjeuner),” in Martha Lucy and John House, Renoir in the Barnes Foundation (Barnes Foundation/Yale University Press, 2012), p. 75, fig. 1.

Stefanie Manthey, “Chronology,” in Renoir: Between Bohemia and Bourgeoisie; The Early Years, ed. Nina Zimmer, exh. cat. (Kunstmuseum Basel/Hatje Cantz, 2012), p. 286.

Stefanie Manthey and Nina Zimmer, “Catalogue of Exhibited Works,” in Renoir: Between Bohemia and Bourgeoisie; The Early Years, ed. Nina Zimmer, exh. cat. (Kunstmuseum Basel/Hatje Cantz, 2012), pp. 114–15; 200–01, cat. 40 (ill.).

Christopher Lloyd, “Coastal Adventures, Riparian Pleasures: The Impressionists and Boating,” in Christopher Lloyd, Daniel Charles, and Phillip Dennis Cate, with a contribution by Giles Chardeau, Impressionists on the Water, exh. cat. (Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco/Skira Rizzoli, 2013), pp. 28; 29, ill. 24.

“Cat. 2: Lunch at the Restaurant Fournaise (The Rowers’ Lunch), 1875,” in Renoir Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, ed. Gloria Groom and Jill Shaw (Art Institute of Chicago, 2014).

Ownership History

Sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris, July 8, 1881, for 600 francs. [1]

Acquired by Alphonse Legrand, Paris, by Nov. 21, 1887. [2]

Sold by Alphonse Legrand, Paris, to Boussod, Valadon & Cie (Theo van Gogh), Paris, Nov. 21, 1887, for 200 francs. [3]

Sold by Boussod, Valadon & Cie (Theo van Gogh), Paris, to Guyotin, Paris, Nov. 22, 1887, for 350 francs. [4]

Sold by Guyotin, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, Paris, Mar. 21, 1892, for 1,300 francs. [5]

Transferred from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, New York, Mar. 22, 1892. [6]

Sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Potter Palmer, Chicago, Apr. 9, 1892, for $1,100. [7]

By descent from Potter Palmer (died 1902), Chicago, to the Palmer family. [8]

Given by the Palmer family to the Art Institute of Chicago, 1922.

NOTES

[1] According to Colin Bailey, the painting is Durand-Ruel, Paris stock no. 1452, which was purchased from Renoir by Durand-Ruel on July 8, 1881, as Conversation (bords de la Seine), for 600 francs. See John Collins to the Art Institute of Chicago, July 28, 1997, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago; and Colin B. Bailey, with the assistance of John B. Collins,Renoir’s Portraits: Impressions of an Age, exh. cat. (National Gallery of Canada/Yale University Press, 1997), p. 308, n. 8.

[2] According to John Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1248 (Jan. 1973), p. 14; and Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists—II,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1249 (Feb. 1973), p. 103. In the February 1973 article, Rewald identifies Legrand as “Legrand. 40, rue Blanche, Paris; a dealer at 122bis, rue Laffitte. As early as 1876 lent one painting each by Renoir and Sisley to the second Impressionist group exhibition. As a competitor of Durand-Ruel, worked closely with Goupil in Paris and Knoedler in New York.” See Rewald, “Theo van Gogh II,” p. 107. According to Boussod, Valadon & Cie, Paris, stock book 12, 1887–91 (no. 18877, as Canotiers) the painting was sold by Legrand to Boussod, Valadon & Cie on Nov. 21, 1887, for 200 francs. The Goupil & Cie/Boussod, Valadon & Cie Stock Books are located at the Getty Research Institute’s Research Library, Special Collections, Los Angeles; the stock books have been digitized and are available on the Getty Research Institute’s website. A photocopy of this page is in the curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[3] According to John Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1248 (Jan. 1973), p. 14; and Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists—II,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1249 (Feb. 1973), p. 103. This transaction is recorded in Boussod, Valadon & Cie, Paris, stock book 12, 1887–91 (no. 18877, as Canotiers) and includes a price code “RNX,” decoded by the Getty Research Institute’s online database as 200 francs. The Goupil & Cie/Boussod, Valadon & Cie Stock Books are located at the Getty Research Institute’s Research Library, Special Collections, Los Angeles; the stock books have been digitized and are available on the Getty Research Institute’s website. A photocopy of this page is in the curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. This painting is identified as Boussod, Valadon & Cie stock no. 18877 in Chris Stolwijk and Richard Thomson, with a contribution by Sjraar van Heugten, Theo van Gogh (1857–1891): Art Dealer, Collector, and Brother of Vincent, exh. cat. (Van Gogh Museum/Waanders, 1999), p. 216, cat. 125. The dimensions recorded in the stock book are 50 × 32 cm; the dimensions for the Art Institute’s painting are 55 × 65.9 cm.

[4] According to John Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1248 (Jan. 1973), p. 14; and Rewald, “Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists—II,” Gazette des beaux-arts 81, 1249 (Feb. 1973), p. 103. In the February 1973 article, Rewald identifies Guyotin as “&aps;Guyotin. ‘Marchand-amateur,’ rue Grange-Batelière, Paris.” See Rewald, “Theo van Gogh II,” p. 106. This transaction is recorded in Boussod, Valadon & Cie, Paris, stock book 12, 1887–91 (no. 18877, as Canotiers) and includes a price code “EAN,” decoded by the Getty Research Institute’s online database as 350 francs. The Goupil & Cie/Boussod, Valadon & Cie Stock Books are located at the Getty Research Institute’s Research Library, Special Collections, Los Angeles; the stock books have been digitized and are available on the Getty Research Institute’s website. A photocopy of this page is in the curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. This painting is identified as Boussod, Valadon & Cie stock no. 18877 in Chris Stolwijk and Richard Thomson, with a contribution by Sjraar van Heugten, Theo van Gogh (1857–1891): Art Dealer, Collector, and Brother of Vincent, exh. cat. (Van Gogh Museum/Waanders, 1999), p. 216, cat. 125. The dimensions recorded in the stock book are 50 × 32 cm; the dimensions for the Art Institute’s painting are 55 × 65.9 cm.

[5] This transaction is recorded in the Durand-Ruel, Paris, stock book for 1891 (no. 2064, as Déjeuner de canotiers): “Vendu par Guyotin à Durand-Ruel Paris le 21 mars 1892 pour 1300 francs, Déjeuner de canotiers,” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Oct. 5, 2010, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[6] According to Anne Distel, “Oarsmen (known as Luncheon by the River),” in Hayward Gallery, Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Paris, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Renoir, exh. cat. (Arts Council of Great Britain, 1985), p. 216. This transfer is also noted by John Collins; see John Collins to the Art Institute of Chicago, July 28, 1997, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[7] This transaction is recorded in the Durand-Ruel, New York, stock book for 1888–93 (no. 932, as Déjeuner de canotiers): “vendu par Durand-Ruel NY à Potter Palmer le 9 avril 1892 pour $ 1100, Déjeuner de canotiers,” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Oct. 5, 2010, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[8] This painting was on loan from the Palmer family to the Art Institute of Chicago, intermittently, by 1921, according to Museum Registration Department Artists Sheets, on file in Museum Registration, Art Institute of Chicago.