About This Artwork

Roman

Statue of a Seated Woman, 2nd century A.D.

Marble
82 x 63.5 x 38.2 cm (32 3/8 x 25 x 15 in.)

Katherine K. Adler Memorial Fund, 1986.1060

Roman sculptors often adapted the forms of earlier Greek artworks for use in entirely new contexts. This statue evokes the figures of seated, draped goddesses displayed in the pediments of the Parthenon, the renowned temple on the Acropolis in Athens. Among the Romans, this statue type was widely used for sculptures of female deities such as Juno (the Greek Hera), the consort of Jupiter (the Greek Zeus), as well as for portraits of empresses and other prominent women. Here the figure’s head and arms, now missing, were made separately and attached by means of dowels, the holes for which are visible.

— Permanent collection label


This work appears in the online catalogue Roman Art at the Art Institute of Chicago, featuring art historical essays and conservation reports on artworks from the ancient Roman world in the Art Institute’s collection. Entries include new high-resolution photography, stunning 360-degree views of the works, and in-depth technical imaging and analysis. The volume is free to the public.

Exhibition, Publication and Ownership Histories

Exhibition History

Art Institute of Chicago, Myth and Legend in Classical Art, February 28, 1987–August 26, 1987, no cat.

Art Institute of Chicago, Sculpture from the Classical Collection, September 1, 1987–August 31, 1988, no cat.

The Art Institute of Chicago, Ancient Art Galleries, Gallery 156, April 20, 1994-February 6, 2012.

The Art Institute of Chicago, Of Gods and Glamour: The Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Art, November 11, 2012-present.

Publication History

Katharine A. Raff, “Cat. 12 Statue of a Seated Woman: Curatorial Entry,” in Roman Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago, 2016).

Rachel C. Sabino, with contributions by Lorenzo Lazzarini, “Cat. 12 Statue of a Seated Woman: Technical Report,” in Roman Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago, 2016).

Karen B. Alexander, “From Plaster to Stone: Ancient Art at the Art Institute of Chicago,” in Recasting the Past: Collecting and Presenting Antiquities at the Art Institute of Chicago, ed. Karen Manchester (Art Institute of Chicago, 2012), p. 39, n. 134.

Cornelius C. Vermeule III, “Roman Art,” in “Ancient Art at the Art Institute of Chicago,” special issue, Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies 20, 1 (1994), pp. 71–72, cat. 49 (ill.).

Louise Berge, “‘A Lady Seated on a Rock . . .’ Now in the Art Institute of Chicago,” Ancient World 15, 3–4 (1987), cover, p. 50 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, “Report of the Director,” Art Institute of Chicago Annual Report 1986–1987 (Art Institute of Chicago, 1987), p. 23, fig. 11.

Art Institute of Chicago, “Acquisitions,” Art Institute of Chicago Annual Report 1986–1987 (Art Institute of Chicago, 1987), p. 58.




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