About This Artwork

Attributed to Raffaello Botticini
Italian, 1477–c.1520

The Adoration of the Magi, c. 1495

Tempera on panel (poplar)
diameter 104.2 cm (41 in.)

Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson Collection, 1937.997

Exhibition, Publication and Ownership Histories

Exhibition History

Chicago, The University of Chicago, The Renaissance Society, Commemorative Exhibition from the Martin A. Ryerson Collection, 1932, no. 4, as Francesco Botticini.

Art Institute of Chicago, Century of Progress, 1933, cat. 112, as Francesco Botticini.

Art Institute of Chicago, Century of Progress,1934, cat. 46A, as Francesco Botticini.

Art Institute of Chicago, The Christmas Story in Art, 1938–1939, as Francesco Botticini, no cat.

Art Institute of Chicago, Masterpiece of the Month, November 1940, as Francesco Botticini, no cat.

Burlington, Vermont, Robert Hull Fleming Museum, 1947, no cat.

Chicago, Federal Savings and Loan Association, Christmas Exhibition, 1954–55, no cat.

Art Institute of Chicago, Art Inside Out, 1992–1996, no cat.

Art Institute of Chicago, Silk Road, 2006, no cat.

Publication History

Theodore Child, “A Pre-Raphaelite Mansion” in Art and Criticism. Monographs and Studies, New York, 1892, p. 317, ill.

Ernst Kühnel, Francesco Botticini, Strasbourg, 1906, pp. 16–17, 37, pl. XI (3).

Bernard Berenson, The Florentine Painters of the Renaissance, 3d ed., New York and London, 1909, p. 119.

J. A. Crowe and G. B. Cavalcaselle, A History of Painting in Italy, 2d ed, vol. 4, ed. R. Langton Douglas, New York, 1911, p. 297 n. 1.

Raimond van Marle, The Development of the Italian Schools of Painting, vol. 13, 1931, p. 398 (ill.).

Bernard Berenson, Italian Pictures of the Renaissance, Oxford, 1932, p. 107.

William R. Valentiner, Paintings in the Collection of Martin A. Ryerson, unpub. MS [1932], Archives, The Art Institute of Chicago, no p.

Bernard Berenson, Pitture italiane del Rinascimento, Milan, 1936, p. 96.

“Exhibition of the Ryerson Gift,” Bulletin of The Art Institute of Chicago 32 (1938), p. 3; reprinted as J. L. Allen, “Entire Ryerson Collection Goes to The Chicago Art Institute,” Art News 36, 21, p. 10, ill.

Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 32 (1938), cover ill.

K. L. Brewster, “The Ryerson Gift to The Art Institute of Chicago,” Magazine of Art 31 (1938), p. 97, ill.

The Art Institute of Chicago, A Picture Book: Masterpieces of Painting, XV and XVI Centuries in the Collections of The Art Institute of Chicago, 1946, pp. 12–13, ill.

Art Institute of Chicago, An Illustrated Guide to the Collections of The Art Institute of Chicago, 1948, p. 26.

Martin Davies, National Gallery Catalogues: The Earlier Italian Schools, London, 1951, p. 78, under no. 1033.

Art Institute of Chicago, Masterpieces in The Art Institute of Chicago, 1952, no p.

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings in The Art Institute of Chicago: A Catalogue of the Picture Collection, 1961, p. 226.

Bernard Berenson, I disegni dei pittori fiorentini, Milan, 1961, vol. 1, p. 11.

Hans Huth, “Italienische Kunstwerke im Art Institute von Chicago, USA,” in Miscellanea Bibliothecae Hertzianae, Munich, 1961, p. 516.

Martin Davies, National Gallery Catalogues: The Earlier Italian Schools, 2d ed., London, 1961, p. 102, under no. 1033.

André Chastel, The Studios and Styles of Renaissance Italy, 1460–1500, London, 1966, p. 18, ill.

Art Institute of Chicago, Grands Musées 2, Paris [1968], pp. 25 (ill.), 68.

Burton B. Fredericksen and Federico Zeri, Census of Pre-Nineteenth-Century Italian Paintings in North American Public Collections, Cambridge, Mass., 1972, pp. 35, 272, 571.

Ronald Lightbown, Sandro Botticelli, London, 1978, vol. 2, pp. 25–26, no. B11.

J. Devisse and M. Mollat, The Image of the Black in Western Art, Lausanne, 1979, vol. 2, pp. 164–66, ill.

Ellis Waterhouse, “Earlier Paintings in the Earlier Years of the Art Institute: The Role of the Private Collectors,” The Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies 10 (1983), pp. 86, 91, no. 10, fig. 6.

Herbert Percy Horne, Alessandro Filipepi, Commonly Called Sandro Botticelli, Painter of Florence [first published 1908], ed. by C. Caneva, Florence, 1987, vol. 3, p. 224.

Christopher Lloyd, Italian Paintings before 1600 in The Art Institute of Chicago; A Catalogue of the Collection, Chicago, 1993, pp. 49–53, ill.

Glad Tidings of Great Joy. Christmas of The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 1993, pp. 28–29, ill., 39.

Roberta J. M. Olson, The Florentine Tondo, Oxford, 2000, p. 239, fig. A13.

Byron Ellsworth Hamann, "Chronological Pollution: Potsherds, Mosques, and Broken Gods before and after the Conquest of Mexico," Current Anthropology 49, 5 (2008), pp. 815, 817, fig. 7.

Jean Devisse and Michel Mollat, “The African Transposed,” in David Bindman and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., eds., The Image of the Black in Western Art, vol. 2, pt. 2 (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1979), pp. 188–90, fig. 165.

Ownership History

Possibly Alexander Barker (died 1874), London [according to catalogue of the Leyland sale, though it is not the one described in Gustave Waagen, Galleries and Cabinets of Art in Great Britain, London, 1857, p. 71 as Dello Fiorentino (?), nor the tondo attributed to Filippo Lippi in the Barker sale, June 19, 1879, no. 489]. Frederick Richards Leyland, London, by 1892, as Filippino Lippi [Child 1892 illustrates the painting in his salon]; sold, Christie’s, London, May 28, 1892, lot 97, to Jeffrey [buyer listed in annotated catalogue at the Getty Research Center]. Emile Gavet, Paris, by 1894 [date of sale given in registrar’s record]; sold to Martin A. Ryerson (died 1932), Chicago, 1894, at his death to his widow (died 1937); bequeathed to Art Institute, 1937.




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