About This Artwork

Claude Monet
French, 1840-1926

Branch of the Seine near Giverny (Mist), from the series "Mornings on the Seine", 1897

Oil on canvas
89.9 x 92.7 cm (35 3/8 x 36 1/2 in.)
Inscribed lower left: Claude Monet 97

Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson Collection, 1933.1156

Wildenstein, Claude Monet, cat rais. 1996 1475; Wildenstein, Claude Monet, biographie et catalogue raisonné, 1979 1475



Claude Monet painted the 18 works in his Mornings on the Seine series from a flat-bottomed boat anchored to the riverbank where the Epte River flows into the Seine. There, as the light changed from dawn to day, he worked on one canvas after another. To keep them in order, he numbered them, placed them in grooves built into the boat, and had the gardener whom he enlisted as his assistant hand them to him.

— Permanent collection label

This work is featured in the online catalogue Monet Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, the first volume in the Art Institute’s scholarly digital series on the Impressionist circle. The catalogue offers in-depth curatorial and technical entries on 47 artworks by Claude Monet in the museum’s collection; entries feature interactive and layered high-resolution imaging, previously unpublished technical photographs, archival materials, and documentation relating to each artwork.

Exhibition, Publication and Ownership Histories

Exhibition History

Paris, Galerie George Petit, Exposition Claude Monet, June–July 1898.

New York, Durand-Ruel, Paintings by Claude Monet, Dec. 9–23, 1916, cat. 10, as Matinée sur la Seine.

Toledo (Ohio) Museum of Art, Paintings by French Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, Nov. 7–Dec. 12, 1937, cat. 15 (ill.).

Akron (Ohio) Art Institute, Oct. 18, 1946–Nov. 10, 1947, no cat.

Boston, Mass., Richard C. Morrison, Nov. 19, 1948–Dec. 26, 1950, no cat.

Art Institute of Chicago, The Paintings of Claude Monet, Apr. 1–June 15, 1957, no cat. no.

Art Institute of Chicago, The Artist Looks at the Landscape, June 22–Aug. 25, 1974, no cat.

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings by Monet, Mar. 15–May 11, 1975, cat. 99 (ill.).

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Monet in the ’90s: The Series Paintings, Feb. 7–Apr. 29, 1990, cat. 78 (ill.); Art Institute of Chicago, May 19–Aug. 12, 1990; London, Royal Academy of Arts, Sept. 7–Dec. 9, 1990 (Boston and Chicago only).

Art Institute of Chicago, Claude Monet, 1840–1926, July 22–Nov. 26, 1995, cat. 108 (ill.).

Florence, Sala Bianca di Palazzo Pitti, Claude Monet: La poesia della luce; Sette capolavori dell’Art Institute di Chicago a Palazzo Pitti, June 2–Aug. 29, 1999, no cat. no. (ill.).

Zurich, Kunsthaus Zürich, Monet’s Garten, Oct. 29, 2004–Mar. 13, 2005, cat. 34 (ill.).

Fort Worth, Tex., Kimbell Art Museum, The Impressionists: Master Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago, June 29–Nov. 2, 2008, cat. 81 (ill.).

Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, Okla., Monet and the Seine: Impressions of a River, June 29-September 21, 2014; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, October 26, 2014-February 1, 2015, cat. 44 (ill.).

Publication History

Durand-Ruel Galleries, New York, Paintings by Claude Monet, exh. cat. (Durand-Ruel, 1916), cat. 10.

Art Institute of Chicago, A Guide to the Paintings in the Permanent Collection (Art Institute of Chicago, 1925), p. 162, cat. 2138.

M. C., “Monets in the Art Institute,” Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 19, 2 (Feb. 1925), p. 20.

Toledo (Ohio) Museum of Art, Paintings by French Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, exh. cat. (Toledo Museum of Art, 1937), cat. 15.

“News Notes,” Magazine of Art, Akron (Ohio) Art Institute Edition (Nov. 1946), p. iii.

Oscar Reuterswärd, Monet: En konstnärshistorik (Bonniers, 1948), p. 283.

Art Institute of Chicago, “Homage to Claude Monet,” Art Institute of Chicago Quarterly 51, 2 (Apr. 1, 1957), p. 24.

Art Institute of Chicago, “Catalogue,” Art Institute of Chicago Quarterly 51, 2 (Apr. 1, 1957), p. 33.

Art Institute of Chicago, Paintings in the Art Institute of Chicago: A Catalogue of the Picture Collection (Art Institute of Chicago, 1961), p. 321.

Grace Seiberling, “The Evolution of an Impressionist,” in Paintings by Monet, ed. Susan Wise, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1975), p. 37.

Susan Wise, ed., Paintings by Monet, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1975), p. 156, cat. 99 (ill.).

Grace Seiberling, “Monet’s Series” (Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1976), pp. 189; 335, n. 1.

Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet: Biographie et catalogue raisonné, vol. 3, Peintures, 1887–1898 (Bibliothèque des Arts, 1979), pp. 210; 211, cat. 1475 (ill.).

Charles F. Stuckey, ed., Monet: A Retrospective (Hugh Lauter Levin, 1985), p. 183 (ill.).

Grace Seiberling, Monet in London, exh. cat. (High Museum of Art/University of Washington Press, 1988), p. 14, fig. 9.

Richard Kendall, ed., Monet by Himself: Paintings, Drawings, Pastels, Letters, trans. Bridget Strevens Romer (Macdonald Orbis, 1989), pp. 221 (ill.), 320.

Paul Hayes Tucker, Monet in the ’90s: The Series Paintings, exh. cat. (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston/Yale University Press, 1989), pp. 219; 220, pl. 82; 223; 299, cat. 78.

Martha Kapos, ed., The Impressionists: A Retrospective (Hugh Lauter Levin/Macmillan, 1991), p. 31 (ill.).

Martha Kapos, ed., The Post-Impressionists: A Retrospective (Hugh Lauter Levin/Macmillan, 1993), p. 41, pl. 9.

Natasha Staller, “Babel: Hermetic Languages, Universal Languages and Anti-Languages in Fin de Siècle Parisian Culture,” Art Bulletin 76, 2 (June 1994), p. 338, fig. 8.

Andrew Forge, Monet, Artists in Focus (Art Institute of Chicago, 1995), pp. 53–55; 94, pl. 23; 108.

Charles F. Stuckey, with the assistance of Sophia Shaw, Claude Monet, 1840–1926, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago/Thames & Hudson, 1995), pp. 129, cat. 108 (ill.); 230; 247.

Paul Hayes Tucker, Claude Monet: Life and Art (Yale University Press, 1995), pp. 158; 162, pl. 185.

Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue raisonné/Werkverzeichnis, vol. 3, Nos. 969–1595 (Taschen/Wildenstein Institute, 1996), pp. 613, cat. 1475 (ill.); 614.

Simonella Condemi and Andrew Forge, Claude Monet: La poesia della luce; Sette capolavori dell’Art Institute di Chicago a Palazzo Pitti, exh. cat. (Giunti, 1999), pp. 42 (detail), 43 (ill.).

Art Institute of Chicago, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism in the Art Institute of Chicago, selected by James N. Wood (Art Institute of Chicago/Hudson Hills, 2000), p. 153 (ill.).

Charles Stuckey, “Monet e la Senna,” in Monet: I luoghi della pittura, ed. Marco Goldin, exh. cat. (Linea d’Ombra, 2001), p. 63 (ill.).

Dario Gamboni, Potential Images: Ambiguity and Indeterminacy in Modern Art (Reaktion, 2002), pp. 109; 111, ill. 81; 113; 170; 297.

Christoph Becker, “Monet’s Garten,” in Monet’s Garten, ed. Christoph Becker, exh. cat. (Kunsthaus Zürich/Hatje Cantz, 2004), pp. 60; 62, cat. 34 (ill.). Translated by Fiona Elliot as "Monet’s Garden,” in Monet’s Garden, ed. Christoph Becker, exh. cat. (Kunsthaus Zürich/Hatje Cantz, 2004), pp. 60; 62, cat. 34 (ill.).

Christopher Butler, Pleasure and the Arts: Enjoying Literature, Painting, and Music (Oxford University Press, 2004), pp. 94; pl. 5; 232.

Nicolas de Warren, “Ad Infinitum: Boredom and the Play of Imagination,” in Infinite Possibilities: Serial Imagery in 20th-Century Drawings, exh. cat. (Davis Museum and Cultural Center/University of Washington Press, 2004), p. 11, fig. 6.

Marco Goldin, ed., Monet, la Senna, le ninfee: Il grande fiume e il nuovo secolo, exh. cat. (Linea d’Ombra, 2004), pp. 118–19 (ill.).

Gloria Groom and Douglas Druick, with the assistance of Dorota Chudzicka and Jill Shaw, The Impressionists: Master Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago/Kimbell Art Museum, 2008), pp. 160–61, cat. 81 (ill.); 163; 167. Simultaneously published as Gloria Groom and Douglas Druick, with the assistance of Dorota Chudzicka and Jill Shaw, The Age of Impressionism at the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago/Yale University Press, 2008), pp. 160–61, cat. 81 (ill.); 163; 167.

Pascal Bonafoux, Monet, peintre de l’eau (Chêne/Hachette, 2010), pp. 136 (ill.), 174.

“Cat. 36: Branch of the Seine near Giverny (Mist), from the series ‘Mornings on the Seine,’ 1897” in Monet Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, ed. Gloria Groom and Jill Shaw (Art Institute of Chicago, 2014).

Ownership History

Acquired from [unknown] by Jos Hessel, Paris, by Oct. 26, 1916. [1]

Sold by Jos Hessel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, Paris, Oct. 26, 1916, for 20,000 francs. [2]

Sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, New York, Nov. 6 or Dec. 4, 1916. [3]

Sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Martin A. Ryerson, Chicago, Dec. 8, 1916, for $10,000. [4]

Sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Martin A. Ryerson, Chicago, Dec. 8, 1916, for $10,000. [5]

Bequeathed by Martin A. Ryerson (died 1932), Chicago, to the Art Institute of Chicago, 1933. [6]

NOTES

[1] According to Durand-Ruel, Paris, stock book for 1913–21 (no. 10908, as Matinée sur la Seine, 1897): “Purchased from Hessel by DR Paris on 26 October 1916 for 20 000 F / Stock DR Paris no. 10908; photo no. 8134,” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 5, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. According to Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue raisonné/Werkverzeichnis, vol. 3, Nos. 969–1595 (Taschen/Wildenstein Institute, 1996), pp. 613, cat. 1475 (ill.); 614, this painting was sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel in 1913. The information from Durand-Ruel (Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 5, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago) does not mention the 1913 purchase directly from the artist.

[2] The transaction is recorded in the Durand-Ruel, Paris, stock book for 1913–21 (no. 10908, as Matinée sur la Seine, 1897): “Purchased from Hessel by DR Paris on 26 October 1916 for 20 000 F / Stock DR Paris no. 10908; photo no. 8134,” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 5, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[3] The Paris and New York Durand-Ruel stock books record different dates for the sale. The Paris stock book for 1913–21 (no. 10908, as Matinée sur la Seine, 1897) states: “Sold to DR New York on 6 November 1916.”The New York stock book for 1904–24 (no. 4023, as Matinée sur la Seine, 1897) states: “Purchased by DR New York on 4 December 1916.” As confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 5, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[4] The transaction is recorded in the Durand-Ruel, New York, stock book for 1904–24 (no. 4023, as Matinée sur la Seine, 1897): “sold to M.A. Ryerson on 8 December 1916 for $ 10 000,” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 5, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. A purchase receipt on Durand-Ruel letterhead, dated December 26, 1916, includes this painting as one of several sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to M. A. Ryerson. Photocopy in curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. This painting was on loan from Martin A. Ryerson to the Art Institute of Chicago, intermittently, by 1924, according to Museum Registration department artists sheets, on file in Museum Registration, Art Institute of Chicago.

[5] According to Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue raisonné/Werkverzeichnis, vol. 3, Nos. 969–1595 (Taschen/Wildenstein Institute, 1996), pp. 613, cat. 1475 (ill.); 614, the painting was put up for sale at Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, but was withdrawn from the sale. See Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, Valuable Paintings by Modern French and Barbizon Artists and Renaissance Master, Property of a Mid-Western Educational Institution, pt. 2, sale cat. (Parke-Bernet Galleries, May 4, 1944), p. 34, lot 47.There is an annotated copy of this sale catalogue in the Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson and Burnham Library, which includesthe notation 1200 written next to no.47. Receipt of object 9253 (on file Museum Registration, Art Institute of Chicago) includes this painting as one of several that were returned to the Art Institute on May 29, 1944, and states these paintings were unsold.

[6] See Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue raisonné/Werkverzeichnis, vol. 3, Nos. 969–1595 (Taschen/Wildenstein Institute, 1996), pp. 611–12; 613, cat. 1475 (ill.); 614. Wildenstein states that, due to the repetition of titles, it is difficult to identify with any certainty most of the paintings dated “97” that were exhibited. As a result of his research for Claude Monet, 1840-1926, Charles F. Stuckey concluded that this painting was one of the misty scenes, thus identifying it with one of the paintings Monet titled Bras de Seine, près Giverny (Brouillard), under the section heading “Séries des Matins sur la Seine.” Therefore, it is likely that the Art Institute’s painting was one of the five paintings exhibited as Bras de Seine, près Giverny (Brouillard), 1897 (cats 41–43, 47–48).




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