About This Artwork

Claude Monet
French, 1840-1926

Waterloo Bridge, Gray Weather, 1900

Oil on canvas
65.4 x 92.6 cm (25 3/4 x 36 3/8 in.)
Signed, l.l.: "Claude Monet"

Gift of Mrs. Mortimer B. Harris, 1984.1173

If not for the fog, Claude Monet once remarked, “London wouldn’t be a beautiful city. It’s the fog that gives it its magnificent breadth.” While working on his London series, he rose early every day to paint Waterloo Bridge in the morning, moving on to Charing Cross Bridge at midday and in the afternoon. He observed both motifs from his fifth-floor window at the Savoy Hotel. The Art Institute’s two Waterloo Bridge paintings are dated 1900 and 1903, but both were likely begun in 1900 and dated only when Monet felt that they were finished. He worked on all of his London paintings in his studio in Giverny, refusing to send any of them to his dealer until he was satisfied with them as an ensemble.

Exhibition, Publication and Ownership Histories

Exhibition History

Probably Paris, Galeries Durand-Ruel, Claude Monet: Vues de la Tamise à Londres, May 9–June 4, 1904, cat. 9, as Temps gris. 1900, under the heading Waterloo Bridge.

Berlin, Paul Cassirer, Neue Ausstellung, Werke von: Claude Monet, Louis Corinth, Hans Thoma, Manet, Degas. Skulpturen von Rodin u.A., Oct. 9–Nov. 20, 1904, cat. 5, as Waterloo Bridge, temps gris.

Art Institute of Chicago, Treasures of Chicago Collectors, Apr. 15–May 7, 1961, no cat. no.

Art Institute of Chicago, Masterpieces from Private Collections in Chicago, July 12–Aug. 31, 1969, no cat. no.

Tokyo, Bridgestone Museum of Art, Mone ten [Monet, a retrospective], Feb. 11–Apr. 7, 1994, cat. 66 (ill.); Nagoya City Art Museum, Apr. 16–June 12, 1994; Hiroshima Museum of Art, June 18–July 31, 1994.

Shelburne (Vt.) Museum, Apr. 19–Nov. 3, 1995, no cat.

Fort Worth, Tex., Kimbell Art Museum, The Impressionists: Master Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago, June 29–Nov. 2, 2008, cat. 86 (ill.).

Publication History

Probably Galeries Durand-Ruel, Claude Monet: Vues de la Tamise à Londres, exh. cat. (Galeries Durand-Ruel, 1904), p. 10, cat. 9.

R. de Bettex, “Échos de partout. Claude Monet,” La république française, May 10, 1904, p. 1.

Daniel Catton Rich, “Französische Impressionisten im Art Institute zu Chicago,” Pantheon: Monatsschrift für freunde und sammler der kunst 11, 3 (Mar. 1933), p. 77. Translated by C. C. H. Drechsel as “French Impressionists in the Art Institute of Chicago,” Pantheon/Cicerone (Mar. 1933), p. 18.

Art Institute of Chicago, Treasures of Chicago Collectors, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, 1961), n. pag.

Art Institute of Chicago, Masterpieces from Private Collections in Chicago, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago, [1969]), n. pag.

Art Institute of Chicago, Art Institute of Chicago Annual Report, 1984-85 (Art Institute of Chicago, 1985), pl. 12.

Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet: Biographie et catalogue raisonné, vol. 4, Peintures, 1899–1926 (Bibliothèque des Arts, 1985), pp. 170; 171, cat. 1557 (ill.); 365, letters 1723, 1724; 427, pièces justificatives 169, 170.

Richard R. Brettell, Post-Impressionists (Art Institute of Chicago/Abrams, 1987), pp. 91; 94 (ill.); 118.

Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet: Catalogue raisonné, vol. 5, Supplément aux peintures: Dessins; Pastels; Index (Wildenstein Institute, 1991), p. 52, cat. 1557.

Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation; and Nagoya City Art Museum, eds., Mone ten [Monet, a retrospective], exh. cat. (Chunichi Shimbun, 1994), p. 188, cat. 66 (ill.).

Paul Hayes Tucker, “Of Sites and Subjects and Meaning in Monet’s Art,” in Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation; and Nagoya City Art Museum, eds., Mone ten [Monet, a retrospective], exh. cat. (Chunichi Shimbun, 1994), pp. 37, 72.

Andrew Forge, Monet, Artists in Focus (Art Institute of Chicago, 1995), pp. 56; 57; 59 (detail); 98, pl. 27; 109.

Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue raisonné/Werkverzeichnis, vol. 3, Nos. 969–1595 (Taschen/Wildenstein Institute, 1996), pp. 676–77, cat. 1557 (ill.).

Simonella Condemi and Andrew Forge, Claude Monet: La poesia della luce; Sette capolavori dell’ Art Institute di Chicago a Palazzo Pitti, exh. cat. (Giunti Gruppo, 1999), pp. 44 (ill.), 46.

Art Institute of Chicago, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism in the Art Institute of Chicago, selected by James N. Wood (Art Institute of Chicago/Hudson Hills, 2000), p. 156 (ill.).

Norio Shimada and Keiko Sakagami, Kurōdo Mone meigashū: Hikari to kaze no kiseki [Claude Monet, 1881–1926], vol. 2 (Nihon Bijutsu Kyōiku Sentā, 2001), pp. 112, no. 239 (ill.); 113 (detail); 190.

John E. Thornes and Gemma Metherell, “The Art and Science of London’s Atmosphere around 1900,” in London’s Environment: Prospects for a Sustainable City, ed. Julian Hunt (Imperial College Press, 2005), p. 119.

Jay A. Clarke, “Adrienne Farb and the Anti-Hip of Abstraction,” in The Spiritual Landscapes of Adrienne Farb, 1980–2006, ed. Jay A. Clarke and Joanna E. Ziegler, exh. cat. (Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Art Gallery, College of the Holy Cross, 2006), pp. 48–49, fig. 4.

Gloria Groom and Douglas Druick, with the assistance of Dorota Chudzicka and Jill Shaw, The Impressionists: Master Paintings from the Art Institute of Chicago, exh. cat. (Art Institute of Chicago/Kimbell Art Museum, 2008), pp. 168, cat. 86 (ill.); 169. Simultaneously published as Gloria Groom and Douglas Druick, with the assistance of Dorota Chudzicka and Jill Shaw, The Age of Impressionism at the Art Institute of Chicago (Art Institute of Chicago/Yale University Press, 2008), pp. 168, cat. 86 (ill.); 169.

Cheryl Hill, “Useful Publications: Catalogues Raisonnés,” in “Art through the Pages: Library Collections at the Art institute of Chicago,” special issue, Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies 34, 2 (2008), pp. 63, figs. 1–2; 64.

“Cat. 38: Waterloo Bridge, Gray Weather, 1900,” in Monet Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, ed. Gloria Groom and Jill Shaw (Art Institute of Chicago, 2014).

Ownership History

Sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris, May 11, 1904, for 9,000 francs. [The transaction is recorded in the Durand-Ruel, Paris, stock book for 1901–13 (no. 7643, as La Tamise, Waterloo Bridge, temps couvert, 1901): “Purchased from Monet by DR Paris on 11 May 1904 for 9 000 F / Stock DR Paris no. 7643; Photo Druet [sic] no. 22 / (no. 11 of the exhibition),” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 21, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Paul Cassirer, Berlin, Nov. 28, 1904, for 11,500 francs. [The transaction is recorded in the Durand-Ruel, Paris, stock book for 1901–13 (no. 7643, as La Tamise, Waterloo Bridge, temps couvert, 1901): “Sold to Cassirer on 28 November 1904 for 11 500 F,” as confirmed by Paul-Louis Durand-Ruel and Flavie Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel Archives, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Feb. 21, 2013, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Acquired by Albrecht Guttmann, Berlin, by May 18, 1917. [See Paul Cassirer and Hugo Helbing, Moderne gemälde: Die sammlung Albrecht Guttmann und nachlass eines Berliner sammlers, sale cat. (Paul Cassirer and Hugo Helbing, May 18, 1917), lot. 69 (ill.), as Waterloo – Brücke in London.]

Sold at the Albrecht Guttmann, Berlin, sale, Paul Cassirer (Berlin) and Hugo Helbing (Munich), Berlin, May 18, 1917, lot 69. [See Paul Cassirer and Hugo Helbing, Moderne gemälde: Die sammlung Albrecht Guttmann und nachlass eines Berliner sammlers, sale cat. (Paul Cassirer and Hugo Helbing, May 18, 1917), lot. 69 (ill.), as Waterloo – Brücke in London.]

Acquired by Howard Young, New York. [According to Art Dealers Association of America, report, Mar. 8, 1995, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Acquired by Mrs. Potter Palmer, Chicago. [According to Art Dealers Association of America, report, Mar. 8, 1995, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Acquired by Anderson Gallery, Chicago, c. 1927. [See Art Dealers Association of America, report, Mar. 8, 1995, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. This information is further corroborated by a telephone conversation between Courtney Donnell, Art Institute of Chicago, and Jeanne Hansell (daughter of Mrs. Mortimer B. Harris), March 1999, see provenance worksheet, dated June 17, 1999, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Sold by Anderson Gallery, Chicago, to William Redfield, Chicago, c. 1927. [According to Jeanne Hansell (daughter of Mrs. Mortimer B. Harris), relayed to Courtney Donnell, Art Institute of Chicago, March 1999 telephone conversation; see conversation summary in provenance worksheet, June 17, 1999, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Given by William Redfield, Chicago, to his sister, Mrs. Mortimer B. (Ethel R.) Harris, Chicago, c. 1930. [According to Jeanne Hansell (daughter of Mrs. Mortimer B. Harris), relayed to Courtney Donnell, Art Institute of Chicago, telephone conversation, Mar. 1999, see conversation summary in provenance worksheet, June 17, 1999, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.]

Given by Mrs. Mortimer B. (Ethel R.) Harris, Chicago, to the Art Institute of Chicago, beginning in 1984. [The painting was given to the Art Institute of Chicago in undivided fractional interests beginning in 1984. The Art Institute received the final fractional interest for one hundred percent ownership in 2000.]




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